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Welcome to the 2016 American Classical League Institute
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Saturday, June 25
 

1:00pm

National Greek Exam Committee Meeting
Speakers
avatar for Wilifred Major

Wilifred Major

Associate Professor of Classics, Louisiana State University
I work on the pedagogy of Ancient Greek at all levels (K-20). My job is to help anyone teaching Greek or who want to start teaching Greek.
GS

Generosa Sangco-Jackson

National Greek Exam Chair, Oak Hall School Junior


Saturday June 25, 2016 1:00pm - 4:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1215

4:00pm

ACL Technology Committee Meeting
Speakers
avatar for Cindy Caltagirone

Cindy Caltagirone

National Training Academy IT, ACL Technology Committee


Saturday June 25, 2016 4:00pm - 6:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1215

4:00pm

Organizational Development Meeting with Steering and Executive Committees
Speakers
LM

Linda Montross

Co-chair, National Latin Exam
avatar for Amy Sommer

Amy Sommer

Latin teacher, Cherry Creek High School
avatar for Amy Wishnick

Amy Wishnick

Principal, Wishnick & Associates LLC
Amy Wishnick is passionate about organizations. With skill, sensitivity, and good humor, Amy works with diverse organizations to enhance their management, leadership, and adaptive capacities to be more effective. Since founding Wishnick & Associates in 2004, she has worked with an array of nonprofit clients on strategic planning, organizational assessments, executive transition and succession planning, board development, and more. Clients include... Read More →

Executive Committee
avatar for Ronnie Ancona

Ronnie Ancona

Editor, The Classical Outlook, Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center
avatar for Rachel Ash

Rachel Ash

ACL Treasurer-Elect, Parkview High School
I teach in a large program (with 4.5 teachers!) in a public school using Comprehensible Input methods. I just finished my Master's and am just waiting for the paperwork to go through, and my studies in graduate school informed a lot of my teaching in the past few years, since I stopped using a textbook. I am excited to meet other teachers and old friends at ACL and trade ideas and understanding.
DC

Donald Connor

Vice President, American Classical League
AE

Amy Elifrits

Chair, and Creative Arts, National Junior Classical League
KE

Kathy Elifrits

President, American Classical League
avatar for John Gruber-Miller

John Gruber-Miller

Vice-President Elect, American Classical League
Editor, Teaching Classical Languages | Edwin R. and Mary E. Mason Professor of Languages, Cornell College
DH

Debra Heaton

Treasurer, American Classical League
avatar for Sherwin Little

Sherwin Little

Administrator, American Classical League
Administrator, American Classical League
avatar for Patrick McFadden

Patrick McFadden

ACL Secretary, St Mary's Episcopal School
I am particularly interested in issues of linguistics and pedagogy. Most of my work deals with applying Reading Theory to teaching Latin/Greek. I am also heavily involved in Tennessee's Latin Helps publicity campaign. Friend Latin Helps on FB, follow @LatinHelps on Twitter, or search #latinhelps on any social medium.
TW

Todd Wegenhart

TMRC Director, American Classical League
CW

Cynthia White

Placement Director, American Classical League
avatar for Nick Young

Nick Young

Lead Latin Instructor, University of Detroit Jesuit H.S. & Academy ; University of Detroit Mercy
Nick Young has 45 years experience in the class room, the last 25 at University of Detroit Jesuit High School in Detroit, Michigan. He is also an instructor at the University of Detroit Mercy and had the responsibility of reinstating its Latin program. He has a BA and an MA in Latin and Classics from Wayne State University, as well as course work at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, summer studies in Latin with Fr. Reginaldus... Read More →


Saturday June 25, 2016 4:00pm - 6:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1207

6:00pm

Pre-Institute Session 1: Comprehensible Input Strategies: Scaffolding and Sequencing for the Latin Classroom
Interested in learning how to implement Comprehensible Input for a weeklong unit? Want to experience Comprehensible Input yourself as a student? During these six hours, participants will receive a hands-on demonstration of Comprehensible Input strategies, while taking part in pre-reading activities needed for reading a passage of classical text. In addition, participants will engage in post-reading activities for consolidation/extension purposes.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Ash

Rachel Ash

ACL Treasurer-Elect, Parkview High School
I teach in a large program (with 4.5 teachers!) in a public school using Comprehensible Input methods. I just finished my Master's and am just waiting for the paperwork to go through, and my studies in graduate school informed a lot of my teaching in the past few years, since I stopped using a textbook. I am excited to meet other teachers and old friends at ACL and trade ideas and understanding.
avatar for Robert Patrick

Robert Patrick

Chair, Foreign Language Department, Latin Teacher, Parkview High School
For more than half of my 27 years as a Latin teacher, I have devoted myself to creating classrooms where all kinds of learners are welcome and where all students can be successful. My work has come to focus on Comprehensible Input as the key piece to this work: delivering understandable messages in Latin in a variety of ways.
KT

Keith Toda

Latin Teacher, Brookwood High School
I like long walks on the beach at night. | | "I feel so strongly that deep and simple is far more essential than shallow and complex." Mr. Rogers


Saturday June 25, 2016 6:00pm - 9:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 208/210

6:00pm

Pre-Institute Session 2: Catching Them in the Middle Part 1: Educational Neuroscience Changes for the Latin Classroom
     The speaker will present 10 practical applications of recent brain study. She will identify classroom implications of each, leaving teachers with suggestions for classroom change. Experienced Latin teachers will provide classroom models illustrating each application. Participants will infuse their own unit plans with examples of applications. Both the speaker and experienced Latin teachers will consult with participants during work time. Participants will share their creations with the group, discussing which applications will be most useful for their students.
The workshop's second half focuses on vocabulary acquisition. The speaker will present a variety of teaching games and oral activities designed to introduce new vocabulary and/or to provide practice of vocabulary. Experienced Latin teachers will provide models applied to their classrooms. Participants will infuse their own lessons with these activities. Both the speaker and experienced Latin teachers will work with participants. The session will conclude with a sharing of materials created.

Speakers
RC

Rickie Crown

Latin Methodology Instructor, National Louis University



Saturday June 25, 2016 6:00pm - 9:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

6:00pm

Pre-Institute Session 3: “Challenge Areas” of the AP Latin Syllabus
In this workshop, participants will work in small groups to identify areas of the AP Latin Syllabus that they find challenging. The AP Latin Chief Reader will select four of these areas—two from the Vergil part of the syllabus, and two from the Caesar part—and discuss strategies to improve students’ comprehension of this material. Finally, participants will identify new methods of assessing students’ understanding of these challenge areas as they work to prepare their students for the 2017 exam.

Speakers
avatar for Keely Lake

Keely Lake

Teacher of Latin and Ancient Greek; Coordinator of Interdisciplinary Programs, Wayland Academy


Saturday June 25, 2016 6:00pm - 9:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1211

6:00pm

Pre-Institute Session 4: Harnessing the Power of One-to-one Technology: Tech tools to make your Latin class more efficient, innovative and collaborative!

This Pre-Institute session is for teachers who are interested in more regularly incorporating technology into their classroom. The Google suite of apps (i.e. Google Docs, Slides, Calendar etc.) will be the main focus, but other useful tools will be provided as well. We will use the time learning not only about the traditional, but also the little known uses for these apps (canned responses in gmail! multi-step quizzes in google forms!). We will also break into groups to explore these apps and create or update lessons for the next school year! My hope is that you leave this session with various ideas for improving efficiency, collaboration and innovation in the classroom and the continued desire to explore new technologies!


Speakers
avatar for Brandy Henricks-Marson

Brandy Henricks-Marson

Flint Hill School


Saturday June 25, 2016 6:00pm - 9:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

6:30pm

ACL Executive Committee Meeting
Executive Committee
avatar for Ronnie Ancona

Ronnie Ancona

Editor, The Classical Outlook, Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center
avatar for Rachel Ash

Rachel Ash

ACL Treasurer-Elect, Parkview High School
I teach in a large program (with 4.5 teachers!) in a public school using Comprehensible Input methods. I just finished my Master's and am just waiting for the paperwork to go through, and my studies in graduate school informed a lot of my teaching in the past few years, since I stopped using a textbook. I am excited to meet other teachers and old friends at ACL and trade ideas and understanding.
DC

Donald Connor

Vice President, American Classical League
AE

Amy Elifrits

Chair, and Creative Arts, National Junior Classical League
KE

Kathy Elifrits

President, American Classical League
avatar for John Gruber-Miller

John Gruber-Miller

Vice-President Elect, American Classical League
Editor, Teaching Classical Languages | Edwin R. and Mary E. Mason Professor of Languages, Cornell College
DH

Debra Heaton

Treasurer, American Classical League
avatar for Sherwin Little

Sherwin Little

Administrator, American Classical League
Administrator, American Classical League
avatar for Patrick McFadden

Patrick McFadden

ACL Secretary, St Mary's Episcopal School
I am particularly interested in issues of linguistics and pedagogy. Most of my work deals with applying Reading Theory to teaching Latin/Greek. I am also heavily involved in Tennessee's Latin Helps publicity campaign. Friend Latin Helps on FB, follow @LatinHelps on Twitter, or search #latinhelps on any social medium.
TW

Todd Wegenhart

TMRC Director, American Classical League
CW

Cynthia White

Placement Director, American Classical League
avatar for Nick Young

Nick Young

Lead Latin Instructor, University of Detroit Jesuit H.S. & Academy ; University of Detroit Mercy
Nick Young has 45 years experience in the class room, the last 25 at University of Detroit Jesuit High School in Detroit, Michigan. He is also an instructor at the University of Detroit Mercy and had the responsibility of reinstating its Latin program. He has a BA and an MA in Latin and Classics from Wayne State University, as well as course work at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, summer studies in Latin with Fr. Reginaldus... Read More →

Saturday June 25, 2016 6:30pm - 9:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1207
 
Sunday, June 26
 

8:00am

Pre-Institute Session 1: Comprehensible Input Strategies: Scaffolding and Sequencing for the Latin Classroom
Interested in learning how to implement Comprehensible Input for a weeklong unit? Want to experience Comprehensible Input yourself as a student? During these six hours, participants will receive a hands-on demonstration of Comprehensible Input strategies, while taking part in pre-reading activities needed for reading a passage of classical text. In addition, participants will engage in post-reading activities for consolidation/extension purposes.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Ash

Rachel Ash

ACL Treasurer-Elect, Parkview High School
I teach in a large program (with 4.5 teachers!) in a public school using Comprehensible Input methods. I just finished my Master's and am just waiting for the paperwork to go through, and my studies in graduate school informed a lot of my teaching in the past few years, since I stopped using a textbook. I am excited to meet other teachers and old friends at ACL and trade ideas and understanding.
avatar for Robert Patrick

Robert Patrick

Chair, Foreign Language Department, Latin Teacher, Parkview High School
For more than half of my 27 years as a Latin teacher, I have devoted myself to creating classrooms where all kinds of learners are welcome and where all students can be successful. My work has come to focus on Comprehensible Input as the key piece to this work: delivering understandable messages in Latin in a variety of ways.
KT

Keith Toda

Latin Teacher, Brookwood High School
I like long walks on the beach at night. | | "I feel so strongly that deep and simple is far more essential than shallow and complex." Mr. Rogers


Sunday June 26, 2016 8:00am - 11:00am
San Jacinto Center Room 208/210

8:00am

Pre-Institute Session 2: Catching them in the Middle Part 2: Games & Activities for Vocabulary Acquisition
     The speaker will present 10 practical applications of recent brain study. She will identify classroom implications of each, leaving teachers with suggestions for classroom change. Experienced Latin teachers will provide classroom models illustrating each application. Participants will infuse their own unit plans with examples of applications. Both the speaker and experienced Latin teachers will consult with participants during work time. Participants will share their creations with the group, discussing which applications will be most useful for their students.
The workshop's second half focuses on vocabulary acquisition. The speaker will present a variety of teaching games and oral activities designed to introduce new vocabulary and/or to provide practice of vocabulary. Experienced Latin teachers will provide models applied to their classrooms. Participants will infuse their own lessons with these activities. Both the speaker and experienced Latin teachers will work with participants. The session will conclude with a sharing of materials created.

Speakers
RC

Rickie Crown

Latin Methodology Instructor, National Louis University



Sunday June 26, 2016 8:00am - 11:00am
San Jacinto Center Room 206

8:00am

Pre-Institute Session 3: “Challenge Areas” of the AP Latin Syllabus
In this workshop, participants will work in small groups to identify areas of the AP Latin Syllabus that they find challenging. The AP Latin Chief Reader will select four of these areas—two from the Vergil part of the syllabus, and two from the Caesar part—and discuss strategies to improve students’ comprehension of this material. Finally, participants will identify new methods of assessing students’ understanding of these challenge areas as they work to prepare their students for the 2017 exam.

Speakers
avatar for Keely Lake

Keely Lake

Teacher of Latin and Ancient Greek; Coordinator of Interdisciplinary Programs, Wayland Academy


Sunday June 26, 2016 8:00am - 11:00am
San Jacinto Center Room 1211

8:00am

Pre-Institute Session 5: Putting Theory into Practice: CLC and the ACTFL Modes
Speakers
avatar for Virginia Blasi

Virginia Blasi

"The more faithfully you listen to the voice within you, the better you hear what is sounding outside of you." Dag Hammerskjold


Sunday June 26, 2016 8:00am - 11:00am
San Jacinto Center Room 204

9:00am

NJCL Committee Meeting
Speakers
MB

Melissa Burgess

Oh, Indian Hill
DJ

David Jackson

Academic Contests Chair, Oak Hall School Senior
avatar for Sherry Jankowski

Sherry Jankowski

adult, Flint Hill School
Programs Chair, NJCL, living Latin, The Walking Dead
avatar for Caitlin Johnston

Caitlin Johnston

Publications Chair, scl
WL

William Lee

Certamen Chair
TM

Tony Martin

Olympika Chair / NSCL Advisor, National Junior Classical League
TR

Tom Reed

Digital Contests Chair
Digital Contests Chair, NJCL
avatar for Sue Robertson

Sue Robertson

adult, NJCL Convention Advisor
Please let me know how things are going for you during the week of convention and what you would like to see changed, etc.
avatar for Catherine Sturgill

Catherine Sturgill

Public Relations/Membership Chair
DV

Dobbie Vasquez

Communications Chair, Menlo School Upper School
Communications Chair, NJCL; Program and Scholarship Committees, ACL; Open Certamen Chair, CJCL; Past President and Secretary, CCA-North
DW

Dennis Webb

Constitutional Advisor

Executive Committee
AE

Amy Elifrits

Chair, and Creative Arts, National Junior Classical League

Sunday June 26, 2016 9:00am - 12:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1207

11:30am

12:30pm

Welcome Session for First Time Attendees
Come find out how to get the most out of Institute and ask all your questions! 

moderators
KE

Kathy Elifrits

President, American Classical League
avatar for Sherwin Little

Sherwin Little

Administrator, American Classical League
Administrator, American Classical League

Sunday June 26, 2016 12:30pm - 1:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1211

1:00pm

1A Textual Relations: Spicing up the Latin Classroom with Authentic Materials

The goal for many of our classes is that students become proficient readers of Latin in order to engage with Latin literature. This panel is designed to help teachers select texts that form thematic units, use authentic Latin texts in multiple modes when working students at all levels of proficiency from novice-low to advanced-high and beyond, and use texts to inform discussions about culture and language. Teachers and students need not feel limited to the task of translation, nor the time period of the Classical era. Latin enjoys a vast patrimony of authentic texts that appeal to a wide range of learners.


moderators
Speakers
AV

Alan van den Arend

Graduate Student, University of Kentucky
I'm a graduate student at the University of Kentucky, with previous teaching experience at suburban high schools in NJ. I completed my BA in Classics from Cornell in 2010, was a fellow at the Academia Vivarium Novum from 2013-2014, and am currently pursuing my MA in Classics at UK, along with certifications in Latin Studies and Social Theory. My research interests focus on intellectual history and Latin reception, especially in the Neo-Latin... Read More →
avatar for Justin Slocum Bailey

Justin Slocum Bailey

Teacher, Trainer, Thinker-bigger, Indwelling Language
I am gung-ho about about making second language acquisition more joyful and more successful for both learners and teachers. I would love to think big with you about how to provide maximum CI with minimal prep.
avatar for Elizabeth Hestand

Elizabeth Hestand

Latin Teacher, Central High School - Phila School District
Living Latin, Pedagogy, Roman Archaeology/Ceramology (especially Amphorae!!)


Sunday June 26, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

1:00pm

1B A New Beginning for Ancient Greek

The Cambridge School Classics Project is currently in the early stages of scoping out a beginners’ course in Ancient Greek, suitable for middle/high school students. The aim is to create a course that focuses on the development of reading capability and an integration of language and culture, thus adhering to the method and approach we adopted in the Cambridge Latin Course. The course will eventually consist of an integration of both print and digital materials.


moderators
avatar for Wilifred Major

Wilifred Major

Associate Professor of Classics, Louisiana State University
I work on the pedagogy of Ancient Greek at all levels (K-20). My job is to help anyone teaching Greek or who want to start teaching Greek.

Speakers
WG

Will Griffiths

University of Cambridge


Sunday June 26, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

1:00pm

1C Technology in the Comprehensible Input Latin Classroom: How to Go Beyond Kahoot
The current buzz in education is all about technology implementation for the development of a 21st century classroom. Most teachers, however, are using technology for the wrong reasons due to a lack of pedagogical knowledge. Are Comprehensible Input theory and technology compatible? Come learn how one can utilize technology to support the Comprehensible Input Latin classroom. Participants are advised to bring their personal technologies with them, as a number of different websites, apps, and programs will be demonstrated.

moderators
avatar for Robert Patrick

Robert Patrick

Chair, Foreign Language Department, Latin Teacher, Parkview High School
For more than half of my 27 years as a Latin teacher, I have devoted myself to creating classrooms where all kinds of learners are welcome and where all students can be successful. My work has come to focus on Comprehensible Input as the key piece to this work: delivering understandable messages in Latin in a variety of ways.

Speakers
KT

Keith Toda

Latin Teacher, Brookwood High School
I like long walks on the beach at night. | | "I feel so strongly that deep and simple is far more essential than shallow and complex." Mr. Rogers



Sunday June 26, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

1:00pm

1D Location, Location, Location! Context is everything!

When presented with a new interpretive reading task, language learners often stress over vocabulary and forget to consider context. But the original location of every reading or artifact carries with it a wealth of information necessary for genuine comprehension. This session examines the importance of identifying and responding to extra-textual clues - such as literary genre, history, and culture - and provides strategies to support and increase understanding.


moderators
avatar for Mary Pendergraft

Mary Pendergraft

Professor of Classical Languages, Wake Forest University
Chair, NCLG

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Kelly

Caroline Kelly

Online Latin Instructor, Mitchell Community College
My primary goal is to enable my students to read fluently. I am always looking for way to to help them to manage Latin sentences with confidence so that they can comprehend a passage, reading left to right without translating.



Sunday June 26, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
UTC Room 4.110

1:00pm

1E rebus novis conandis: using one-on-one technology in a Latin classroom

Bring your Latin classroom into the 21st century by trying new things in technology. In this workshop we will cover how one-on-one technology can be used in your classroom. We will cover teacher websites, self-grading quizzes and fun online reviews. We will also look at applications and websites that allow students to produce Latin in fun and innovative ways. All the methods can be accessed using an iPad or computer. Attendees will view examples and participate in online examples.


moderators
avatar for Brandy Henricks-Marson

Brandy Henricks-Marson

Flint Hill School

Speakers
avatar for Adam Sales

Adam Sales

Latin Teacher, Flower Mound High School
I grew up in north Texas, and I attended Texas Tech University. I have taught Latin at Flower Mound High School for eleven years, with students actively involved in the Texas State and National Junior Classical League. With my school district's emphasis on technology, specifically 1:X iPad use, I've worked toward innovative teaching built on the time-honored foundation of classical pedagogy.
avatar for Melisande Santos

Melisande Santos

Latin teacher/World Lang Dept Chair, Marcus HS
I grew up in North Carolina. I attended the University of North Carolina and University of North Texas. I have been teaching Latin at Marcus HS for 24 years. My students are actively involved in the area and state Junior Classical League competitions, as well as chapter events. | Our school district has a 1:X program where each student is provided with an iPad, as well as has access to MacBooks. This has allowed everyone in the district to... Read More →


email docx

Sunday June 26, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
UTC Room 4.112

2:00pm

Break - Grand Opening of the Exhibit Area
Come celebrate the opening of the Exhibit Area

Sunday June 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
San Jacinto Center Multi-Purpose Room

2:00pm

ACL Finance Committee
Executive Committee
avatar for Rachel Ash

Rachel Ash

ACL Treasurer-Elect, Parkview High School
I teach in a large program (with 4.5 teachers!) in a public school using Comprehensible Input methods. I just finished my Master's and am just waiting for the paperwork to go through, and my studies in graduate school informed a lot of my teaching in the past few years, since I stopped using a textbook. I am excited to meet other teachers and old friends at ACL and trade ideas and understanding.
DH

Debra Heaton

Treasurer, American Classical League

Sunday June 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1211

2:00pm

2:30pm

2A Una Uni: Making the Most of a 1:1 Technology Program

Having a one to one laptop or ipad program in your school can provide great opportunities for student engagement and put additional tools in the hands of students and teachers. This workshop will explore some of the tools available online for use in the classroom. From polling and quizzing students in class to using Google docs to facilitate collaborative work, we will demonstrate a myriad of ways to use technology in the Latin classroom. We welcome teachers who are just beginning to investigate using more technology in the classroom, and we invite more experienced 1:1 teachers to share their experiences in this workshop.


moderators
Speakers
avatar for Natalie Cannon

Natalie Cannon

Department Chair & Teacher, Eanes ISD
Salve! I am Natalie Cannon, and I teach Latin, Mythology, and Roman Cultures to the talented and quirky students at Westlake High School. My colleague and I co-sponsor a very large, active Latin Club. I am the President of the Austin-area Armadillo Classical Society, was awarded membership as a PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator, and am also a member of the TCA, ACL, ACTFL, and TCEA. This is my 10th year of teaching Latin, and 9 of those years... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Dill

Lauren Dill

Latin Teacher, St. Andrews Episcopal Upper School
I taught 5th & 6th graders Latin for my first seven years of teaching. I moved to teaching high school Latin this last year and taught Levels 1, 2, and 4 pre-AP. Now that I am in a 1:1 laptop program at the high school level, I have enjoyed using technology in the classroom. I am interested to incorporate more Comprehensible Input strategies into my students' experience, having attended a few related workshops in the last couple of years.
avatar for Jennie Luongo

Jennie Luongo

Latin Department Chair / College Counseling, St. Andrew's Episcopal School



Sunday June 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

2:30pm

2B Let's Make a Story! - Story-Asking for the Comprehensible Input Classroom

Creating stories with students is one of the most powerful tools for comprehensible input/TPRS Latin teachers. It is time to unleash the full potential of this surprisingly simple activity in our classrooms. In this workshop, attendees will learn the fundamental building blocks of "story-asking" and how to use them to promote deep engagement and long-lasting language acquisition.


moderators
avatar for Jennifer Jarnagin

Jennifer Jarnagin

Latin Teacher, The Episcopal School of Dallas
I've been teaching Latin since 2008. I've taught high school levels 1-AP, and now teach mostly middle school. Next year will be my first time teaching 5th and 6th graders, so my focus right now is finding introductory materials and making a curriculum that will challenge and delight this age group and make them want to continue studying Latin. I consider my strengths to be building excitement about Latin and growing Latin programs, classroom... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for John Bracey

John Bracey

Weston Middle School
I am a middle school Latin teacher who teaches using a Comprehensible Input approach. I believe that best practices, equity, and inclusivity are the keys to a successful Latin program.



Sunday June 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

2:30pm

2C So About that Convention Thing: Who we are, what we do, and how your students will benefit from participation in NJCL conventions

Even the most seasoned veterans can lose track of the many convention activities. Which ones are pre-convention? How do you register for certain events? Where can students find preparation materials? How do I network with other teachers in my area who go to convention? Each of us on the Committee has a role to play in making the convention experience a valuable one for teachers and students, veterans and tirones. In this workshop we will explain our particular areas of interest, provide resources, and answer any questions you might have regarding the NJCL Convention.


moderators
avatar for Andrea Stehle

Andrea Stehle

Latin teacher, Stevens High School
Andrea is looking forward to returning to her alma mater for ACL this summer. She is a 1989 graduate of the Classics Department at UT Austin. | She is the author of the sci-fi mythology series: Gods of Arcadia, which now includes books for adults, teens & middle school students.

Speakers
MB

Melissa Burgess

Oh, Indian Hill
DJ

David Jackson

Academic Contests Chair, Oak Hall School Senior
avatar for Sherry Jankowski

Sherry Jankowski

adult, Flint Hill School
Programs Chair, NJCL, living Latin, The Walking Dead
avatar for Caitlin Johnston

Caitlin Johnston

Publications Chair, scl
WL

William Lee

Certamen Chair
TM

Tony Martin

Olympika Chair / NSCL Advisor, National Junior Classical League
TR

Tom Reed

Digital Contests Chair
Digital Contests Chair, NJCL
avatar for Sue Robertson

Sue Robertson

adult, NJCL Convention Advisor
Please let me know how things are going for you during the week of convention and what you would like to see changed, etc.
avatar for Catherine Sturgill

Catherine Sturgill

Public Relations/Membership Chair
DV

Dobbie Vasquez

Communications Chair, Menlo School Upper School
Communications Chair, NJCL; Program and Scholarship Committees, ACL; Open Certamen Chair, CJCL; Past President and Secretary, CCA-North
DW

Dennis Webb

Constitutional Advisor

Executive Committee
AE

Amy Elifrits

Chair, and Creative Arts, National Junior Classical League

Sunday June 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

2:30pm

2D Hard Grammar? What Hard Grammar?

Double datives, gerundives, fear clauses, contrary-to-fact conditionals, and other traditionally "advanced" grammar topics have made not a few Latin teachers and learners question their calling or competence. But when it comes to acquiring a language, there really is no such thing as hard grammar: There is only language one has the means to understand and language one does not have the means to understand. In this session, an expert teacher models a host of engaging techniques, both written and oral, for making “hard” or “advanced” grammatical structures comprehensible and meaningful to students. Participants will see how these structures can be used effectively much earlier in the curriculum than usual, so that there is time for the full range of Latin grammar to become natural to learners. Participants will also receive guided practice in employing the techniques of their choice and ideas for using them in the teaching of literature.


moderators
avatar for Daryl Grissom

Daryl Grissom

Upper School Latin & History Teacher, St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School
Dr. Daryl “Gus” Grissom teaches both History and Classics at St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes School in Alexandria, Virginia. He received his Ph.D. in History at the University of Maryland, College Park, with a dissertation focused on Thucydides’ analysis of the Peloponnesian War. But his tenure as a Communications Officer in the United States Marine Corps gives him a special interest in integrating technology in the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Justin Slocum Bailey

Justin Slocum Bailey

Teacher, Trainer, Thinker-bigger, Indwelling Language
I am gung-ho about about making second language acquisition more joyful and more successful for both learners and teachers. I would love to think big with you about how to provide maximum CI with minimal prep.



Sunday June 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
UTC Room 4.110

3:00pm

National Greek Exam Roundtable Discussion
Come share your ideas for the National Greek Exam with the members of the NGE Committee and other NGE participants. 
All are welcome!  

Speakers
GS

Generosa Sangco-Jackson

National Greek Exam Chair, Oak Hall School Junior


Sunday June 26, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1215

3:00pm

Joint Committee on Classics in American Education (JCCAE) Meeting
Speakers
Executive Committee
KE

Kathy Elifrits

President, American Classical League

Sunday June 26, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1211

4:00pm

3A1 New approaches to Primary Latin

CSCP is working on a project to develop teaching materials for a Latin course aimed at students aged 7-10. It will be delivered completely online and freely available to all schools. The first instalment of the course will be set in Herculaneum. It follows a set of colourful characters in the town, from the wealthiest inhabitants to the simple freedman, including a resident wandering cat. The course integrates the study of archaeology with Latin language. In addition to reading Latin stories, illustrated with drawings based on photographs of the site and new reconstructions, children will have the opportunity to learn about current archaeological and conservational work in Herculaneum. The online nature of the course will enable extensive interactive content, audio support and a high degree of flexibility in delivery. 


moderators
DH

Debra Heaton

Treasurer, American Classical League

Speakers

Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

4:00pm

3A2 Making the Leap: Developing Communicative and Cultural Activities for Petronius' Satyrica

Making the transition from beginning to intermediate Latin need not be a leap, but can be a series of smaller steps designed to prepare students for reading authentic authors. This presentation will show the process how to design activities that integrate communication and culture, that simplify the text, and that also help prepare students to learn key vocabulary and cultural background so that they can read a Latin writer like Petronius. Topics include baths, housing, food, banquets, dinner conversation, games, funerals and commemoration, each illustrated by activities and projects tested in class by the presenter.

http://blogs.cornellcollege.edu/jgrubermiller/2016/06/22/making-the-leap-developing-communicative-and-cultural-activities-for-petronius-satyrica/  


moderators
DH

Debra Heaton

Treasurer, American Classical League

Executive Committee
avatar for John Gruber-Miller

John Gruber-Miller

Vice-President Elect, American Classical League
Editor, Teaching Classical Languages | Edwin R. and Mary E. Mason Professor of Languages, Cornell College

Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

4:00pm

3B Discipuli curricula vendant!: Latin projects beyond the classroom
As Latin teachers, we often face questions about the usefulness of what we do or
how the knowledge of Latin can be a job advantage in a multi-lingual, global
economy. Within individual districts, our programs are only as strong as our ability
to forge meaningful connections with the community at large. Our students
themselves are the best advertisement for our programs, and in this workshop, the
presenter hopes to share some of the ways that he tries to harness his students’
humor and channel their Latin exhibitionism in constructive ways. Participants will
leave this workshop having explored a series of projects which they can adapt for
their own programs - projects in which students can take their knowledge of Latin
to the people, so to speak, and perform for a wider audience beyond the traditional 
classroom setting.

moderators
avatar for Sue Robertson

Sue Robertson

adult, NJCL Convention Advisor
Please let me know how things are going for you during the week of convention and what you would like to see changed, etc.

Speakers
avatar for Edward Zarrow

Edward Zarrow

Westwood High School
Father, husband, Latin teacher @WestwoodHS, language advocate, ACTFL 2016 National Foreign Language Teacher of the Year, President of the Classical Association of MA, 2014-2016, CANE Coordinator of Educational Programs, 2014-2018



Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

4:00pm

3C1 Longinus Rocks

Longinus’ On the Sublime explored the sublime effects in Greek and Roman literature. My purpose here is two-fold. First, to review briefly how Longinus defined the sublime, and second, to illustrate examples of the sublime in several works of modern rock music. In particular, I will examine selected guitar solos by Eric Clapton and others, as well as examining the poetry and singing of artists such as Bob Dylan and Adele. All in all, it will show that the sublime effect is not dead, even in our relatively modest contemporary Western society.


moderators
avatar for Patrick McFadden

Patrick McFadden

ACL Secretary, St Mary's Episcopal School
I am particularly interested in issues of linguistics and pedagogy. Most of my work deals with applying Reading Theory to teaching Latin/Greek. I am also heavily involved in Tennessee's Latin Helps publicity campaign. Friend Latin Helps on FB, follow @LatinHelps on Twitter, or search #latinhelps on any social medium.

Speakers

Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

4:00pm

3C2 Varro and the Teaching of Latin

Marcus Terentius Varro (116-27 BC) was ancient Rome's foremost scholar (vir Romanorum eruditissimus) and most authoritative language scientist (vir peritissimus linguae Latinae). He discovered the declensions and conjugations (and the fut. perf. ind.) of Latin by applying arithmetical models of inflection to Latin nouns and verbs. He based his paradigms on the vowels in the casus sextus, qui est proprius Latinus, i.e., the ablative (singular), and the 2nd. sg. act. He privileged aspect in verbal and oblique plural cases in nominal categories, and he enumerated only four parts of speech (+case -tense, +tense -case, +case +tense, -case -tense). He was also an etymologist at heart and formulated etymologies of precious cultural significance. Varro never waxed pedagogical, but his approach to Latin provided unique insights into its structure and forever changed the way his native language was taught over the centuries. Perhaps we can still learn something from him.


moderators
avatar for Patrick McFadden

Patrick McFadden

ACL Secretary, St Mary's Episcopal School
I am particularly interested in issues of linguistics and pedagogy. Most of my work deals with applying Reading Theory to teaching Latin/Greek. I am also heavily involved in Tennessee's Latin Helps publicity campaign. Friend Latin Helps on FB, follow @LatinHelps on Twitter, or search #latinhelps on any social medium.

Speakers


Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

4:00pm

3D1 A Model for Classics Outreach

In recent decades, outreach and service learning have become buzzwords in higher education. These terms connote issues both of relevance (how is our field applicable “real world” problems?) and of access (how can we reach non-traditional student groups?). This paper will address these questions as they apply to classics. Starting with fundamental questions about outreach, the paper will ask: what are the goals of outreach, to whom should we reach out, how should we reach out, and, importantly, how should we teach and increase access to classics without perpetuating an elitist and colonialist legacy. Ultimately, the paper will outline a model for outreach that looks both outwards and inwards – outwards to increase access to classics by reaching non-traditional learner communities and teaching with non-traditional pedagogies, and inwards to redefine the field by opening new avenues for engagement with classics and diversifying the voices within the field.


moderators
avatar for Kristin Webster

Kristin Webster

Upper School Latin Teacher, The Marymount School
I have been teaching Latin for the past nine years to students of all levels, from elementary to undergraduate. I am particularly interested in curriculum design, assessment, and differentiation through the use of technology. I am also working on an iBook called The Digital Latin Classroom. If you're in my session, feel free to contact me with any questions: kwebster@marymountnyc.org.

Speakers

Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.110

4:00pm

3D2 Leveraging Your Learning Management System in the 1:1 Latin Classroom

This workshop provides an understanding of how to maximize the benefits of the LMS in their 1:1 classrooms. Participants will leave this session with tips and strategies that can immediately be incorporated into their teaching practice.

The first half of the session will address the LMS in the Latin 1 classroom. Main topics:

  1. Best practices for organizing and distributing assignments.

  2. Strategies to design assignments that provide timely, meaningful feedback to students while simultaneously reducing your grading load.

The second half of the session will deal with the Latin Reading Project, a modular approach used for intermediate to advanced classes that are mainly focused on reading, understanding, and analyzing  literature. The Latin Reading Project is designed to achieve these ends:

  1. Differentiation

  2. Student-led learning

  3. Increased one-on-one time with students

While the presenter uses the Canvas LMS, the tips and strategies presented in this session should work for any robust LMS.

Presentation Handouts available here: www.tinyurl.com/2016ACLLMS

moderators
avatar for Kristin Webster

Kristin Webster

Upper School Latin Teacher, The Marymount School
I have been teaching Latin for the past nine years to students of all levels, from elementary to undergraduate. I am particularly interested in curriculum design, assessment, and differentiation through the use of technology. I am also working on an iBook called The Digital Latin Classroom. If you're in my session, feel free to contact me with any questions: kwebster@marymountnyc.org.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Hahn

Christine Hahn

Latin/Technology, Archbishop Hoban High School
ON TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA: Used properly, it can be a tool to enhance both Latin learning and life in general. However, without vision and purpose, it's just another distraction from everything wonderful and good. Innovation is going to happen, it's just a question of whether you think teachers should rail against it, lead the way, or be lemmings. | | ON THE PEDAGOGY WARS: Every approach has its benefits and drawbacks. My students have... Read More →


Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.110

4:00pm

3E1 Active Cultural Projects for the Latin Classroom

Learning about Roman culture is an essential part of the Latin classroom. Students can develop a more complete understanding and appreciation of ancient culture through creative or more research-based projects. In this presentation, participants will learn about the following project ideas, which can be implemented at all grade levels: Roman naming ceremonies, mythology essays and plays, the creation of culturally themed movies, and building structures found in a Roman city. Many of these projects include the use of active Latin, incorporating the spoken and written language as a main component. All participants are encouraged to share their own successful projects.


moderators
avatar for Krystal Kubichek

Krystal Kubichek

Vice-chair, ETC
Though I teach in NJ, I live in Philadelphia, PA. I've taught Latin I-IV AP at PHS, a public school in the most diverse district in NJ, for the past 7 years. I've also been lucky enough to have some of the best mentors a Latin teacher can ask for. My students are active in NJCL: we hosted NJ's 2015 Convention. I'm vice-chair of Excellence Through Classics (ETC). I also founded a group on Facebook for Latin teachers in PA, DE, and NJ called the... Read More →

Speakers
CB

Christopher Buczek

Latin Teacher, Cathedral Preparatory School



Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.112

4:00pm

3E2 Altum Videtur?: Latin in Government Mottoes

As the various United States have adopted official mottoes, Latin has rivaled English, with 25 states/territories having at least one English motto, and 25 having at least one Latin motto. But the ways in which the language has been chosen do not appear to be arbitrary, either in time (Latin tended to predominate early, but has been eclipsed by English as a language of choice for most of the last hundred years), or in sophistication of thought (mottoes in English are twice as likely to be nominal sentences, and are simpler than Latin mottoes on the whole both syntactically and philosophically). This presentation will explore the connotations of motto language of choice, and exhort teachers to continue the minor Latin-motto renaissance in their own states.


moderators
avatar for Krystal Kubichek

Krystal Kubichek

Vice-chair, ETC
Though I teach in NJ, I live in Philadelphia, PA. I've taught Latin I-IV AP at PHS, a public school in the most diverse district in NJ, for the past 7 years. I've also been lucky enough to have some of the best mentors a Latin teacher can ask for. My students are active in NJCL: we hosted NJ's 2015 Convention. I'm vice-chair of Excellence Through Classics (ETC). I also founded a group on Facebook for Latin teachers in PA, DE, and NJ called the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Noah Stanzione

Noah Stanzione

Classical Languages Teacher, Pope John XXIII High School


Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.112

4:00pm

National Committee for Latin and Greek (NCLG) Meeting
Speakers
avatar for Mary Pendergraft

Mary Pendergraft

Professor of Classical Languages, Wake Forest University
Chair, NCLG


Sunday June 26, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1207

6:45pm

OPENING PLENARY
Come celebrate the start of this summer's ACL Institute. Hear from our own Dr. Edward Zarrow, ACTFL Language Teacher of the Year.

moderators
KE

Kathy Elifrits

President, American Classical League

Sunday June 26, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
Blanton Museum Auditorium

8:00pm

Welcome Reception
Tonight's reception is to welcome you to Texas! Sponsors are the University of Texas Department of Classics.....

Sunday June 26, 2016 8:00pm - 9:30pm
Blanton Museum Auditorium Foyer
 
Monday, June 27
 

7:30am

ACL Council Meeting
ALL ACL members welcome! Mandatory for voting delegates

moderators
KE

Kathy Elifrits

President, American Classical League

Monday June 27, 2016 7:30am - 9:00am
UTC Room 2.102A

9:00am

Meeting of the ACL Constitution Committee
Speakers
avatar for Ian Hochberg

Ian Hochberg

St Stephens & St Agnes School
St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School Sponsor | National Latin Exam writer / presenter | Certamen moderator | NJCL Scholarship Committee


Monday June 27, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
San Jacinto Center Room 1207

9:00am

4A Get to Know The Classical Outlook, Your ACL Journal

This session is intended for anyone who is interested in learning more about The Classical Outlook, ACL's own journal. Led by the new CO editor, the session will give an overview of the journal, will solicit informal feedback on various aspects of the journal, and will provide essential information about writing for publication (something teachers without this training may particularly appreciate). Current ACL members should get to know their journal and can have important input as the new editor takes the journal to its next stage. Some members of the new Editorial Board will likely be on hand as well.


moderators
avatar for Ronnie Ancona

Ronnie Ancona

Editor, The Classical Outlook, Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Durkin

Kathleen Durkin

Classical Association of the Atlantic States, Garden City High School
Latin, Latin pedagogy, Classics, Classical education, Jeopardy!
avatar for Christine Hahn

Christine Hahn

Latin/Technology, Archbishop Hoban High School
ON TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA: Used properly, it can be a tool to enhance both Latin learning and life in general. However, without vision and purpose, it's just another distraction from everything wonderful and good. Innovation is going to happen, it's just a question of whether you think teachers should rail against it, lead the way, or be lemmings. | | ON THE PEDAGOGY WARS: Every approach has its benefits and drawbacks. My students have... Read More →
avatar for Bruce McMenomy

Bruce McMenomy

Instructor, Principal, Scholars Online
I've been teaching Latin, Greek, literature (classical and other), and history online since 1993. In both Latin and Greek, but also in literature courses in English, my chief goal is mastery of the language, and an understanding of how an author means what he or she means. To that end, I wrote Syntactical Mechanics, which was published by the University of Oklahoma in 2014. | | My B.A. is from Pomona College in Claremont, CA; at UCLA I got as... Read More →
avatar for Teresa Ramsby

Teresa Ramsby

Associate Professor of Classics, UMass Amherst



Monday June 27, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
San Jacinto Center Room 204

9:00am

4C Ecce Romani Teachers' Forum

Questions? Issues? Ideas for using the textbook, Ecce Romani ? Join with fellow teachers to network and to share creative ideas for getting the most out of the text. We look forward to meeting you!


moderators
avatar for Ruth Ann Besse

Ruth Ann Besse

Latin & ESOL Teacher, Reservoir High School
I teach two subjects in a Howard County public high school: Latin and U.S. History for ESOL students. After school, I teach Latin to home-schooled children. Promoting Latin for younger students truly interests me and that's why I am a member of the "Excellence Through Classics Committee" and "The Primary Latin Project."

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Kelly

Caroline Kelly

Online Latin Instructor, Mitchell Community College
My primary goal is to enable my students to read fluently. I am always looking for way to to help them to manage Latin sentences with confidence so that they can comprehend a passage, reading left to right without translating.


Monday June 27, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

9:00am

4D1 Caesarean Aristotelianism

This is a survey of ancient philosophical schools on friendship and then a look at some interesting Caesar passages on the AP syllabus with these in mind.  We'll most closely consider how to think about the episode at 5.44 in Caesar's Gallic War.  


moderators
avatar for Noah Stanzione

Noah Stanzione

Classical Languages Teacher, Pope John XXIII High School

Speakers


Monday June 27, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
UTC Room 4.110

9:00am

4D2 neglectus inimicus - Recruiting Minorities to Latin

Latin has long suffered the reputation of being the language of dead white men. Look at your classes' student make-up. Where is the diversity? How many minority students do you have? Would you like to recruit more into your Latin program. Over the last three years I have targeted minority students for recruitment and grown my program from three block sections to six. If growth continues in this manner, I will need a colleague! How does a solitary Latin teacher do it? I will share my secrets!                                                            


moderators
avatar for Noah Stanzione

Noah Stanzione

Classical Languages Teacher, Pope John XXIII High School

Speakers

Monday June 27, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
UTC Room 4.110

9:00am

4E Comprehensible Consequences

Curious about Comprensible Input? Thinking about TPRS? Not sure what to do or where to start? This session will serve as a teachers' guide to entering the CI/TPRS arena: it will have tips, tricks, and pitfalls to take note of in your first year using this methodology. The session will focus on the outcomes seen after a year of teaching high school Latin with a hybrid model (focusing on CI/TPRS, as well as direct grammar instruction). Talk will include transparent evidence of student production and successes in the class, student portfolios, assessments, etc, as well as a detailed explaination of the structure of the course and a hybrid approach.

Access Presentation:

https://goo.gl/tm3jAD 


moderators
avatar for Charles Umiker

Charles Umiker

Latin Teacher, The Tatnall School
Delaware Delegate | CAAS Delegate

Speakers
avatar for Traci Dougherty

Traci Dougherty

Latin Teacher, SAHS
Latin teacher


Monday June 27, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
UTC Room 4.112

9:00am

10:00am

BREAK
Come visit the exhibit area and enjoy the break sponsored by

Monday June 27, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
San Jacinto Center Multi-Purpose Room

10:00am

10:15am

10:30am

5A Supporting our Teachers: A Tirones Project

The Tirones initiative has been undertaken by the National Committee for Latin and Greek in order to support new teachers. We have learned, first, that mentoring relationships are among the best support we can offer, and second, that veteran teachers benefit from mentoring just as much as new ones do. This discussion will include reflections from teachers on their experiences both as mentors and as someone supported by a mentor. There will be plenty of time for discussion.


moderators
avatar for Mary Pendergraft

Mary Pendergraft

Professor of Classical Languages, Wake Forest University
Chair, NCLG

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Dill

Lauren Dill

Latin Teacher, St. Andrews Episcopal Upper School
I taught 5th & 6th graders Latin for my first seven years of teaching. I moved to teaching high school Latin this last year and taught Levels 1, 2, and 4 pre-AP. Now that I am in a 1:1 laptop program at the high school level, I have enjoyed using technology in the classroom. I am interested to incorporate more Comprehensible Input strategies into my students' experience, having attended a few related workshops in the last couple of years.
avatar for Jennie Luongo

Jennie Luongo

Latin Department Chair / College Counseling, St. Andrew's Episcopal School


Monday June 27, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
San Jacinto Center Room 204

10:30am

5B1 Status Quo of Latin Vocabulary Research

We all know the vocabulary acquisition and retention is key to students' success in Latin. This session will include a survey of current research on secondary language vocabulary and the suggestions it offers Latin teachers. Practical applications for improving student's vocabulary retention using Cambridge Latin Course will be the focus.


moderators
avatar for Ivy Livingston

Ivy Livingston

Preceptor in the Classics, Harvard University

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Stehle

Andrea Stehle

Latin teacher, Stevens High School
Andrea is looking forward to returning to her alma mater for ACL this summer. She is a 1989 graduate of the Classics Department at UT Austin. | She is the author of the sci-fi mythology series: Gods of Arcadia, which now includes books for adults, teens & middle school students.


Monday June 27, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
San Jacinto Center Room 206

10:30am

5B2 Something Old, Something New: the Marriage of Renaissance Latin Pedagogy and Modern Second Language Acquisition (SLA) Theory

The later Renaissance, especially the 16th and 17th centuries, was a bridge between the Medieval scholastic world replete with spoken Latin and the dawning Enlightenment perspectives that ushered in modern philology, culminating in the rise of Altertumswissenschaft and the Grammar/Translation approach. This session seeks to leverage the intermediary nature of that period to our benefit by examining educational theories for language teaching present in Renaissance Latin texts in the light of recent research in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) theory. The objectives of this study are to (1) provide modern Latin teachers with some perspective on the history of Latin teaching, (2) analyze several prominent texts from the era and identify how their methodologies align (or don’t) with the current propositions of SLA theory, and (3) suggest, where possible, ways that we can adopt or adapt some of these ideas to meet the needs and concerns of the modern Latin classroom.


moderators
avatar for Ivy Livingston

Ivy Livingston

Preceptor in the Classics, Harvard University

Speakers
AV

Alan van den Arend

Graduate Student, University of Kentucky
I'm a graduate student at the University of Kentucky, with previous teaching experience at suburban high schools in NJ. I completed my BA in Classics from Cornell in 2010, was a fellow at the Academia Vivarium Novum from 2013-2014, and am currently pursuing my MA in Classics at UK, along with certifications in Latin Studies and Social Theory. My research interests focus on intellectual history and Latin reception, especially in the Neo-Latin... Read More →


Monday June 27, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
San Jacinto Center Room 206

10:30am

5C Ancient Greek at K-12 levels: New Materials and Experiences

In recent years resources have proliferated for Ancient Greek materials at K-12 levels, so that it is now possible to teach younger students without relying on post-secondary textbooks. This workshop showcases materials and experiences for anyone from teachers of full classes to those who have the opportunity to introduce just a little Greek. Presentations will include a survey of available materials, experiences about teaching at these levels, and updates about the National Greek Exam. There will be a table where attendees can see a full range of materials first hand and there will be discussion about what more resources are needed in the future.


moderators
WG

Will Griffiths

University of Cambridge

Speakers
MA

Mallory Ann Hayes

St. Margaret's School
I currently teach Latin to grades 3-5 at a parochial school as well as Latin and Greek for homeschoolers from Beginning to Advanced Placement. I have eight years experience with elementary and middle school Greek curricula and the challenges of transitioning from the Koine materials available for younger students to the Attic materials required on the NGE. I am also the Wyoming State Chair of the NJCL and run a chapter of the JCL which... Read More →
avatar for Wilifred Major

Wilifred Major

Associate Professor of Classics, Louisiana State University
I work on the pedagogy of Ancient Greek at all levels (K-20). My job is to help anyone teaching Greek or who want to start teaching Greek.
GS

Generosa Sangco-Jackson

National Greek Exam Chair, Oak Hall School Junior



Monday June 27, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

10:30am

5D Clause Boundaries and Word Order

In this workshop you will learn how to help students manage the intricate word order that both prose authors and poets naturally employ to impart their ideas to their readers. Keeping in mind that there are generally accepted norms for Latin word order, we will explore how authors veer from these norms and how to help students deal with these variations. Using examples from Caesar and Vergil, participants will learn how to create innovative exercises with subject/verb and noun/adjective agreement as well as other key components that improve a novice reader's ability to comprehend Latin.


moderators
MB

Melissa Burgess

Oh, Indian Hill

Speakers
avatar for David Pellegrino

David Pellegrino

Pittsford Mendon High School



Monday June 27, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
UTC Room 4.110

10:30am

5E Numismatic Caesar: Using Coins in the Latin Classroom

As in so many realms of Roman politics, military affairs, and public relations, Julius Caesar was also an innovator and envelop-pusher with the currency that passed through Roman hands and that thereby offered one of the most ubiquitous and important means of image-making in the Republic. Most famously, with a denarius issued in 44 BCE, his was the first portrait of a living figure to be struck on coinage.

This session introduces and analyzes several coins minted during Caesar’s rise to power and thus opens a tangible view into Roman history for instructors and students alike that complements what they encounter in their Latin texts. The presentation broadens from close-range case studies to concrete pedagogical strategies before opening the floor to further brainstorming and idea-sharing among attendees.


moderators
RC

Rickie Crown

Latin Methodology Instructor, National Louis University

Speakers

Monday June 27, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
UTC Room 4.112

11:00am

12:00pm

Open Discussion about the Institute Program
Look for the marked table in the Jester Dining Hall, near the front in the glass-ed off area

moderators
avatar for John Gruber-Miller

John Gruber-Miller

Vice-President Elect, American Classical League
Editor, Teaching Classical Languages | Edwin R. and Mary E. Mason Professor of Languages, Cornell College

Monday June 27, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Jester Dining Hall

1:00pm

6A 1:1 in a Latin Classroom; Euge aut Eheu?

In my 10 years of teaching Latin, 9 have been in a 1:1 setting.  At the private middle school, it was 1:1 laptops then tablet-hybrids.  At the public high school, it is 1:1 iPads with a device update or change on the imminent horizon.  As a 2015 PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator, I have also benefited from almost a year of working with some amazing teachers and edtechs.  In this 60 minute Workshop, I will share the ups and downs of my experiences, show you examples of how technology works in my classes, share samples of student creations, give you tips and suggestions for resources that have proven valuable, and then the rest of the time is yours so that you can ask questions, share your own experiences, play with something new, collaborate with colleagues, and have time to work on something you can actually bring back to use.


moderators
avatar for Jennie Luongo

Jennie Luongo

Latin Department Chair / College Counseling, St. Andrew's Episcopal School

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Cannon

Natalie Cannon

Department Chair & Teacher, Eanes ISD
Salve! I am Natalie Cannon, and I teach Latin, Mythology, and Roman Cultures to the talented and quirky students at Westlake High School. My colleague and I co-sponsor a very large, active Latin Club. I am the President of the Austin-area Armadillo Classical Society, was awarded membership as a PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator, and am also a member of the TCA, ACL, ACTFL, and TCEA. This is my 10th year of teaching Latin, and 9 of those years... Read More →



Monday June 27, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

1:00pm

6B Project Archaeology: Investigating a Roman Villa

Join us for an exciting trip back in time to investigate Pompeii! How can investigating a Roman villa help us understand the Roman people and their culture? Pompeii and the nearby villas at Oplontis offer a glimpse into the daily life of Romans as well as Rome’s elite. Through archaeology we can explore the material remains of Roman culture to learn about geography, history, art, and natural disasters.


moderators
avatar for Nick Young

Nick Young

Lead Latin Instructor, University of Detroit Jesuit H.S. & Academy ; University of Detroit Mercy
Nick Young has 45 years experience in the class room, the last 25 at University of Detroit Jesuit High School in Detroit, Michigan. He is also an instructor at the University of Detroit Mercy and had the responsibility of reinstating its Latin program. He has a BA and an MA in Latin and Classics from Wayne State University, as well as course work at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, summer studies in Latin with Fr. Reginaldus... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Janke

Rebecca Janke

Latin and World History Teacher, Christ the King Jesuit



Monday June 27, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

1:00pm

6C Results from the 2016 AP Latin Exam Administration

The AP Latin Chief Reader will present data on student performance on the free-response section of the 2016 AP Latin Exam. Participants will gain a clear understanding of how to interpret the results of the 2016 Exam administration, they will learn about the free response rubrics to understand how to improve student performance, and they will discuss their reactions to the AP Latin syllabus and the 2016 Exam.


moderators
avatar for Melisande Santos

Melisande Santos

Latin teacher/World Lang Dept Chair, Marcus HS
I grew up in North Carolina. I attended the University of North Carolina and University of North Texas. I have been teaching Latin at Marcus HS for 24 years. My students are actively involved in the area and state Junior Classical League competitions, as well as chapter events. | Our school district has a 1:X program where each student is provided with an iPad, as well as has access to MacBooks. This has allowed everyone in the district to... Read More →

Speakers

Monday June 27, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

1:00pm

6D Magistrula.com & Ars Computatralis

The first part of this talk will cover the latest updates to Magistrula.com (a Latin-language learning website). These updates include printable worksheets, searchable practice records, new content for the Charts, Forms, & Sentences exercises, and new options for setting up exercises in precisely the way you want (e.g., limiting sentences only to nouns of particular declensions).

The second part of this talk will be a light, fun coding demo, with these objectives in mind:
1) to demystify coding; it's just a thing that anyone can learn how to do if they're interested, and you don't have to learn all of it to make use of some of it
2) to give those who have never encountered code a low-impact introduction
3) to encourage and support those who might be interested in learning how to use code to create resources for the classroom
4) to promoto well-informed dialog about the place of coding in schools

LINKS:
Handout
Magistrula

Some other stuff I've made:
Artes Docendi Noun Exercise
Artes Docendi Sentence Exercise
Garrio Game


moderators
avatar for Kathleen Durkin

Kathleen Durkin

Classical Association of the Atlantic States, Garden City High School
Latin, Latin pedagogy, Classics, Classical education, Jeopardy!

Speakers
avatar for Anna Andresian

Anna Andresian

Frontend Engineer, AltSchool
I taught Middle and Upper School Latin for 11 years in RI, NV, CO, and NJ, then transitioned in 2014 to a career as a software developer. I currently work as a Frontend Engineer at AltSchool in San Francisco, where I get to build software products for our students & teachers. A short list of things I love: pedagogy, curriculum design, programming, historical linguistics, spoken Latin. | | In 2012, I stumbled upon a teaching tool that allowed... Read More →


Monday June 27, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
UTC Room 4.110

1:00pm

6E Constructing Writing Assignments That Support the Common Core

The Common Core literacy standards are challenging teachers across the curriculum to help students read and write more analytically. As Latin teachers, we guide students at all levels to read text critically and carefully already. Small changes to the work we already do can provide great value to our students and schools. In this workshop, we will see models for Latin class assignments that support the key shifts required by the Common Core, and practice constructing Common Core compatible writing assignments for all levels of high school Latin classes.


moderators
Speakers

Monday June 27, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
UTC Room 4.112

1:00pm

2:00pm

BREAK
Come visit the exhibit area and enjoy the break sponsored by

Monday June 27, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
San Jacinto Center Multi-Purpose Room

2:30pm

4:30pm

7A Reading Horace in High School

Students who are reading Vergil, whether for an AP course or for a broader literature course, need to read other texts from the same period, too. Horace CAN be high school friendly, if we choose the right texts and introduce him in a way that helps students connect. In this workshop, we will examine some strategies for introducing Horace to younger readers. We will look at the learning objectives currently in use for the AP Latin exam, and then study and create assignments and assessments for Horace to support students' reading of Vergil.


moderators
avatar for Ronnie Ancona

Ronnie Ancona

Editor, The Classical Outlook, Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center

Speakers

Monday June 27, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

4:30pm

7B Empower your students by Powering Up the Latin Classroom

Power up your classroom with the latest tech tools to energize your Latin Classes using tried and true technology. Engaging, time saving, and fun tools to bring your class into the 21st Century. Whether you have one iPad in your classroom or a full scale 1:1 program with Chromebooks, there is something for everyone. Teach Latin grammar, vocabulary, ancient art, history, mythology, family life, and more while engaging your students with online quizzes, polls, screen sharing tools, video production apps, green screening, online flashcards, interactive posters, virtual field trips, augmented reality, and more. Get charged for a new school year.


moderators
CB

Christopher Buczek

Latin Teacher, Cathedral Preparatory School

Speakers
avatar for Cindy Caltagirone

Cindy Caltagirone

National Training Academy IT, ACL Technology Committee
avatar for Zee Poerio

Zee Poerio

k-8 Computer Teacher, Diocese of Pittsburgh / St. Louise de Marillac School
Zee Poerio is the k-8 Computer teacher and advisor for the Student Technology Team at St. Louise de Marillac Catholic School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where she has been teaching for 18 years. Serving as a Teacher Ambassador for CREATE Lab at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute and on multiple committees for the American Classical League, Zee’s passion is connecting modern technology with ancient studies. @MagistraZee loves... Read More →


Monday June 27, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

4:30pm

7C The 2016 National Latin Exam: What Can It Tell Us About Our Students and Our Teaching?

The National Latin Exam is a tool which teachers can use to assess their students' understanding and progress in the study of Latin. We will review the general statistics from the 2016 exam and then take a closer look at the questions, particularly those questions which the students found to be the easiest and, most importantly, the most difficult to answer. What do these easy and hard questions have to tell us about our teaching? Furthermore, we will examine what answer the students actually gave to the most difficult questions, allowing us to follow their thoughts about and understanding of the language. This may provide some valuable insight into how students learn and how we are teaching. There will be plenty of handouts, a raffle, and ample opportunity for questions and discussion.


moderators
AE

Amy Elifrits

Chair, and Creative Arts, National Junior Classical League

Speakers
avatar for Ian Hochberg

Ian Hochberg

St Stephens & St Agnes School
St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School Sponsor | National Latin Exam writer / presenter | Certamen moderator | NJCL Scholarship Committee
avatar for Mark Keith

Mark Keith

adult, Riverbend High School
National Latin Exam | Teaching Latin in Virginia - positions open!
LM

Linda Montross

Co-chair, National Latin Exam
avatar for Sue Robertson

Sue Robertson

adult, NJCL Convention Advisor
Please let me know how things are going for you during the week of convention and what you would like to see changed, etc.

Executive Committee
DH

Debra Heaton

Treasurer, American Classical League

Monday June 27, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

4:30pm

7D Digital Bridge to Authentic Latin: Eutropius for a New Generation

This talk looks at the process of creating a digital commentary on selections from Eutropius’ Breviarum Historiae Romanae. This work serves as an excellent text for students transitioning from textbook Latin to authentic Latin and helps to provide historical background for students preparing for the AP exam. We compare current digital commentaries and discuss how technology can help make the reading of texts more exciting, more meaningful, and more significant. We delve extensively into the different elements of our commentary on Eutropius, including its cross-platform functionality, and its conformity to Classical Language and Common Core Standards. Bring your own personal electronic device as we give a hands-on demonstration of how it can be used in a one-to-one technology classroom. We’ll show you how we used it in our classroom, and how you can use it in yours.

Check out eutropi.us!  

Also check out our presentation


moderators
avatar for Christine Hahn

Christine Hahn

Latin/Technology, Archbishop Hoban High School
ON TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA: Used properly, it can be a tool to enhance both Latin learning and life in general. However, without vision and purpose, it's just another distraction from everything wonderful and good. Innovation is going to happen, it's just a question of whether you think teachers should rail against it, lead the way, or be lemmings. | | ON THE PEDAGOGY WARS: Every approach has its benefits and drawbacks. My students have... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Katsenes

Matthew Katsenes

Latin Teacher, Moultonborough Academy
Teaching Latin grades 7-12 in Moultonborough, New Hampshire. | | Check out "Furtum Sellarum" our Latin short. Trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1vo4GkSI5o
avatar for Emma Vanderpool

Emma Vanderpool

Monmouth College



Monday June 27, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.110

4:30pm

7E Roman Risk: A Game of World Conquest for the Latin Classroom

The board game Risk may be a product of the Cold War, but more than fifty years after its creation, it remains an entertaining game that can teach important lessons about the challenges of imperial conquest. This session will cover how to create a Roman Empire version of the game for the Latin classroom. This game provides an excellent way for students to develop their critical thinking skills while also learning about the geography of the classical world.


moderators
DJ

David Jackson

Academic Contests Chair, Oak Hall School Senior

Speakers
RS

Ryan Sellers

Memphis University School



Monday June 27, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.112

6:45pm

8E1 Refugees in Classical Texts and the Modern World

This paper will present a semester-long project undertaken by an Advanced Latin class to connect the ancient world to the modern one. The students researched exile and refugees in Greek and Roman literature and secondary scholarship of the Classics. The students also looked at the current refugee crisis in Europe through news media, political commentary, and governmental reports. The students synthesized their ancient findings as a group though an electronic portfolio and presentation. They compared the ancient and modern situations in an individual paper in English. Finally, they created a Latin composition summarizing the humanitarian issues raised by their explorations. By focusing on world language readiness standards through project-based learning, the assignment was intended to develop student abilities in communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. Student language skills, cultural knowledge, and digital literacy all improved over the course of the semester.


moderators
LM

Linda Montross

Co-chair, National Latin Exam

Speakers
avatar for Keely Lake

Keely Lake

Teacher of Latin and Ancient Greek; Coordinator of Interdisciplinary Programs, Wayland Academy


Monday June 27, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
UTC Room 4.112

6:45pm

8A GAFE and Beyond! Google Apps and the One-to-One Latin Classroom

The session will explore using Google Apps for Education, such as forms, drawings, and slides in the Latin classroom, as well as the latest online study and project tools. With Google Slides, for instance, your students can create a "choose your own adventure" story in Latin. With Google Drawing, you can easily create charts or diagrams for students to label, such as noun declensions or the rooms of a house. With Google Forms, you can set up practices and assessments that are fun for the students and easy for the teacher to grade. Attendees will get many ideas and examples they can use in the classroom as well as time and guidance to create some of their own documents and activities.


moderators
avatar for Catherine Sturgill

Catherine Sturgill

Public Relations/Membership Chair

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Loop

Ruth Loop

Latin Teacher, Thomas Dale High School
Llamam virumque cano. Fan of astrophysics, Jeopardy, Learned League, archaeology, linguistics, and the Oxford comma.



Monday June 27, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

6:45pm

8B1 Vergilius Tragicus

Vergil's Aeneid, the poem that T. S. Eliot considered the single central work of the Western canon, has been loved, hated, praised, and reviled for over two millennia. Most agree on its importance; few, however, seem to agree on what it's really about or what its point is, if it has one. Is it chiefly a political tract in epic dress, supporting the Augustan settlements, or (though Vergil denied that he would ever write epic) is it genuine epic with a political overlay? Could it perhaps be something else entirely? This paper draws chiefly upon the poem itself and upon Horace's Odes to show that while the Aeneid is indisputably in the form of an epic, Vergil was deliberately following the internal rationale of Euripidean tragedy. Viewing the poem in this light suggests some different ways of understanding its message as well as its diction, tone, and imagery.


moderators
DC

Donald Connor

Vice President, American Classical League

Speakers
avatar for Bruce McMenomy

Bruce McMenomy

Instructor, Principal, Scholars Online
I've been teaching Latin, Greek, literature (classical and other), and history online since 1993. In both Latin and Greek, but also in literature courses in English, my chief goal is mastery of the language, and an understanding of how an author means what he or she means. To that end, I wrote Syntactical Mechanics, which was published by the University of Oklahoma in 2014. | | My B.A. is from Pomona College in Claremont, CA; at UCLA I got as... Read More →


Monday June 27, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

6:45pm

8B2 Classical Roots of Modern Education

A constant question or topic of discussion for all of us in education is “What is the value of what we do?” We are constantly bombarded with claims about STEM, STEAM, COMMON CORE, and the like.
If we look at writings of Cicero, Quintillian, and others, there are standards set for what constitutes a good education. There are ideals set forth for both teachers and students to achieve the label of “well educated”. These standards are still found in many concepts today, if one digs deeply enough through the labels and jargon. Maybe it is time to pause and re-examine principals set forth 2 millenia ago which can still have a value.


moderators
DC

Donald Connor

Vice President, American Classical League

Executive Committee
avatar for Nick Young

Nick Young

Lead Latin Instructor, University of Detroit Jesuit H.S. & Academy ; University of Detroit Mercy
Nick Young has 45 years experience in the class room, the last 25 at University of Detroit Jesuit High School in Detroit, Michigan. He is also an instructor at the University of Detroit Mercy and had the responsibility of reinstating its Latin program. He has a BA and an MA in Latin and Classics from Wayne State University, as well as course work at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, summer studies in Latin with Fr. Reginaldus... Read More →

Monday June 27, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

6:45pm

8C You’ve Read the Story, Now What Do You Do to Consolidate The Learning?

The presenters will demonstrate a variety of ways to braid together the storyline, vocabulary, reading, language, and culture to consolidate learning. The examples offered will be from stages throughout the Cambridge Latin Course. Attention will be given to the ACTFL and Classical Language standards.


moderators
Speakers

Monday June 27, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

6:45pm

8D1 How Ascanius, The Youth Institute can help the young learners of today become your Latin students of tomorrow

Elementary or Middle School teacher? Come find out how Ascanius can provide you with a myriad of tools and activities for the budding young Classicist! Not only have we developed lessons for language and classical interests, but we also provide training and support for Latin and non-Latin teachers alike!

High School or College teacher? Come find out how Ascanius can provide you with easy activities that can help bolster your club or honor society today, which in turn can help increase your numbers and strengthen your program. We also provide opportunities and support for high school and college students interested in fostering younger student’s love of the ancient world in your immediate community.


moderators
avatar for Cindy Caltagirone

Cindy Caltagirone

National Training Academy IT, ACL Technology Committee

Speakers
avatar for Brandy Henricks-Marson

Brandy Henricks-Marson

Flint Hill School



Monday June 27, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
UTC Room 4.110

6:45pm

8D2 Reassessing Latin Pedagogy: A proposed model for South African students of Latin

Since Latin has been phased out as a subject in many schools world wide, the need for a distance learning model which accommodates both the role of digital tools and the latest trend in classroom methodology has become evident. After identifying the Living Language method as most popular amongst full time students, the strong reliance of this method on visuals and the development of listening and comprehension skills presented a problem. By creating some unique features and tools the presenters developed an e-site, based on the Oxford Latin Course which affords the learner the opportunity to experience Latin as a living and spoken language.


moderators
avatar for Cindy Caltagirone

Cindy Caltagirone

National Training Academy IT, ACL Technology Committee

Speakers

Monday June 27, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
UTC Room 4.110

6:45pm

8E2 Sci-Fi Mythology

This exploration of sci-fi mythology will include a visuals and short movie clips.  

Some of the modern epics I plan to include in my discussion are:  Lightning Thief, Star Wars, Avatar, Hunger Games, Lord of the Rings, and Star Trek.

As a classroom teacher, my emphasis will be on using these modern epics to spark students’ interest in the classics.  I have an example of Oedipus Rex/Antigone as a Star Wars style saga that I will share.


moderators
LM

Linda Montross

Co-chair, National Latin Exam

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Stehle

Andrea Stehle

Latin teacher, Stevens High School
Andrea is looking forward to returning to her alma mater for ACL this summer. She is a 1989 graduate of the Classics Department at UT Austin. | She is the author of the sci-fi mythology series: Gods of Arcadia, which now includes books for adults, teens & middle school students.


Monday June 27, 2016 6:45pm - 7:45pm
UTC Room 4.112

8:00pm

Awards Plenary
Monday June 27, 2016 8:00pm - 9:00pm
Student Activity Center Ballroom

9:00pm

Awards Reception
Celebrate the award winners and your friends at the reception sponsored by the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies.

Monday June 27, 2016 9:00pm - 10:30pm
Student Activity Center, Third FLoor
 
Tuesday, June 28
 

8:30am

9A Recapturing the Joy of Reading Latin

No matter what teaching approach we use in our classroom, at the core of instruction will be the reading of Latin texts. Often our students become hesitant and confused by aspects of Latin’s inflectional nature. We can tear down these mental blocks and build confident readers of Latin by incorporating into our classes a variety of reading methodologies.

This presentation on reading methodologies will cover:
• the importance of good pronunciation and reading aloud
• Dexter Hoyos’s Rules for Reading Latin
• Metaphrasing to help internalize cases/functions
• reading cards to develop left to right reading habits
• developing natural expectations and disambiguation strategies
• embedded readings
• intensive reading vs extensive reading

While this presentation is geared towards instructors/students of reading method textbook series such as the Cambridge Latin Course, Ecce Romani, and the Oxford Latin Course, the information presented will benefit those using the grammar/translation approach as well as those branching out into Comprehensible Input/TPRS.


moderators
avatar for Edward Zarrow

Edward Zarrow

Westwood High School
Father, husband, Latin teacher @WestwoodHS, language advocate, ACTFL 2016 National Foreign Language Teacher of the Year, President of the Classical Association of MA, 2014-2016, CANE Coordinator of Educational Programs, 2014-2018

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Kelly

Caroline Kelly

Online Latin Instructor, Mitchell Community College
My primary goal is to enable my students to read fluently. I am always looking for way to to help them to manage Latin sentences with confidence so that they can comprehend a passage, reading left to right without translating.
avatar for Ginny Lindzey

Ginny Lindzey

Latin Teacher, Dripping Springs High School
I've been teaching Latin from the Cambridge Latin Course for 16 years. During that time, I have incorporated a lot of reading strategies in order to teach students to read Latin from left to right, and not to decode Latin as if it were a secret code (as I had learned), hunting and pecking. I have attended several Rusticatio workshops (Latin Camp, as I call it), and intend to begin shifting much of my teaching to Comprehensible Input in upcoming... Read More →



Tuesday June 28, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
San Jacinto Center Room 204

8:30am

9B How Latin for the New Millennium Addresses the Five Standards: An LNM Editor's Perspectives and a Teacher's LNM Best Practices

The series editor will demonstrate, with specific examples drawn from Levels 1, 2, and 3 texts, how Latin for the New Millennium addresses the five competencies of communications, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities as articulated in the National Standards. Drawing on his work developing correlations between LNM and the National Standards as well as with various state standards and the states’ adaptations and interpretations of the National Standards, the editor will show how teachers, in turn, are empowered to develop and create their own adaptations. Indeed, it is not the text and its teacher manual alone that meet the standards—the teacher undertakes “the” critical role in this process. The teacher presenter, an experienced practitioner and veteran LNM user, will present examples of class activities that represent best practices in addressing the national standards.


moderators
avatar for Emma Vanderpool

Emma Vanderpool

Monmouth College

Speakers
avatar for Ian Hochberg

Ian Hochberg

St Stephens & St Agnes School
St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School Sponsor | National Latin Exam writer / presenter | Certamen moderator | NJCL Scholarship Committee


Tuesday June 28, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
San Jacinto Center Room 206

8:30am

9C1 Penelope's Loom - A Survey of Women's Work

Penelope sits at the heart of The Odyssey. Her three years’ ruse of weaving a burial shroud shows that she is as cunning as Odysseus – but are the suitors really that clueless about the rhythms and progress of women’s work, or is women’s work really that invisible?

We will explore how the stages from fiber source to finished cloth are depicted in Classical art and text. Our examples will include Egypt’s linen industry and Rome’s wool togas. Despite the honorable epitaph, “She spun wool,” no Roman woman could clothe her family by herself – as a brief demonstration of drop-spindle technique will readily show! Dozens of hands, and hundreds of hours of fiber preparation, spinning and weaving underpin Quintus’ new toga or a mummy’s wrappings! Attendees will receive an e-file of the presentation, along with further culture resources for use in the classroom.


moderators
RS

Ryan Sellers

Memphis University School

Speakers

Tuesday June 28, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

8:30am

9C2 Ovid's Greatest Hits: Three Stories from the Metamorphoses Worth Teaching

Ovid's Metamorphoses is a vast epic filled with a lot of great stories. Ovid is a highly respected poet with a style all his own. This 30-minute paper will draw your attention to three stories from the epic that capture the imagination and are particularly interesting to young minds. The stories featured in this talk will be: Pyramus and Thisbe, Echo and Narcissus, and Daedalus and Icarus. The speaker will provide you with information that will help you focus on the significance of the story, as well as the special effects of Ovid's style. These aspects will help your students understand the power of his poetry and Roman poetry in general. The speaker will say a few words also about the later reception of each story so that you can discuss the impact of each story with your students. The session is meant to be a catalyst for your own later investigation into the value of teaching Ovid to Latin students. The speaker will provide worksheets and handouts that you can manipulate for your own use in the classroom.


moderators
RS

Ryan Sellers

Memphis University School

Speakers
avatar for Teresa Ramsby

Teresa Ramsby

Associate Professor of Classics, UMass Amherst


Tuesday June 28, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

8:30am

9D Teaching Vocabulary with Movie Shorts

Using the plethora of short films available on the internet, any Latin teacher can prepare a movie talk that will both engage students and reinforce new vocabulary. This session will demonstrate the activity and walk attendees through creating a movie talk of their own. Attendees will leave the session not only able to prepare and deliver a movie talk in their own classes, but with ideas for follow-up activities as well.


moderators
KT

Keith Toda

Latin Teacher, Brookwood High School
I like long walks on the beach at night. | | "I feel so strongly that deep and simple is far more essential than shallow and complex." Mr. Rogers

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Ash

Rachel Ash

ACL Treasurer-Elect, Parkview High School
I teach in a large program (with 4.5 teachers!) in a public school using Comprehensible Input methods. I just finished my Master's and am just waiting for the paperwork to go through, and my studies in graduate school informed a lot of my teaching in the past few years, since I stopped using a textbook. I am excited to meet other teachers and old friends at ACL and trade ideas and understanding.


Tuesday June 28, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
UTC Room 4.110

8:30am

9E Purposefully Integrating the Common Core to the Classics

The Common Core provides educators a set of academic standards in English language arts/literacy and mathematics for each grade level (K-12). Forty-two states, the District of Columbia, and four US territories have adopted the Core, meaning most teachers in grades K-12 in English language arts and mathematics are to incorporate the standards into classroom instruction. Many other subjects, such as Latin and other Classics courses, can incorporate the Common Core, yet very little training is provided to such teachers on ways to do so.

In this workshop, participants will learn about the Common Core is (and isn't!) and will engage in hands-on activities to link lessons and activities already done in Classics classrooms to the Common Core. Participants will also learn how to utilize the Common Core to create new lessons and will brainstorm ways to use the Common Core to advocate for their departments and classes.

 

This workshop is particularly important because there are many misconceptions regarding the Common Core. Educators may be misinformed that the Common Core is a curriculum or set of strict instructions for teaching students. Often, educators do not realize that the activities and lessons they already implement in the classroom can be linked to the Core. This can be especially true in the Classics classroom. In addition, educators may not be aware that the Core can be used to create new content, and most importantly, be used as a tool for advocacy (especially in times of budgetary cuts). 

 

This workshop will engage participants in a number of ways. First, the presenters will engage the audience by asking a series of questions regarding participants’ present teaching experience (grade levels taught, content manner expertise, requirements/regulations from the district/school regarding Common Core). During this activity, participants will move throughout the room and share experiences with those in similar circumstances. Second, a Myth vs. Fact game will be facilitated to examine participants’ prior knowledge of the Common Core. Third, concrete examples and strategies of ways to link the Common Core to Latin, Mythology, and Greek and Roman History courses will be shared. Fourth, handouts of the Common Core standards will be distributed (with participants asked to sit near those working with similar grade levels). Participants will utilize the Common Core to identify at least one activity or lesson they already implement which can be tied to the Common Core and will share these ideas with the group. In addition, participants will then be asked to go ‘backwards,’ first selecting a standard they are not presently implementing, but could develop an activity to address the standard. In this way, participants will see the utility of the standards, both to document actions they already implement in the classroom but also to gain additional ideas for new content manner. Finally, advocacy for Latin and the Classics will be discussed and ways to utilize the Common Core for such advocacy will be presented. This includes a thorough examination of the standards and documentation of how much Classics content is already imbedded in the Core. School administrators and boards must be aware of the extent to which Classics courses already tie to the Common Core to ensure the continuity of Classics offering at the secondary level.



Tuesday June 28, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
UTC Room 4.112

9:30am

Reception for Middle School Teachers
moderators
RC

Rickie Crown

Latin Methodology Instructor, National Louis University

Tuesday June 28, 2016 9:30am - 10:00am
San Jacinto Center Formal Lounge

9:30am

9:30am

10:00am

10:00am

10A As the British, Austrians, Dutch and Canadians Do: international approaches to curriculum design, teaching and assessment in Classical languages courses

How do schools around the world teach and assess Classical language courses? What modes of communication, texts, assessments and teaching methods are most common? How high is the bar set elsewhere?

And most importantly: who is doing things differently?

This workshop presents the findings of two projects: a comparison of methods of delivery, design, and assessment using curricula from exam boards and governments in Europe, Australia, and North America, as well as the results of an International Baccalaureate survey on teacher practice administered to nearly 200 schools worldwide.

The presentation will highlight evidence-based trends in translation assessment taking hold in Scotland and Austria, a British approach to authentic assessment of reading skills, and elements of curriculum frameworks in Canada and The Netherlands that align particularly well with the ACTFL standards.

During the workshop, participants will be encouraged to reflect on ways these international approaches might benefit their own practice.


moderators
Speakers
avatar for Ryan Joyce

Ryan Joyce

Curriculum manager, DP Classical languages, International Baccalaureate
I taught Latin (and, just once, Ancient Greek) and chaired the Department of Classics at The Brooklyn Latin School, a specialized public school in New York City. At TBLS, we had a four-year madatory Latin requirement that culminated in the IB Latin exam. | | After six years at TBLS, I moved to Den Haag, Netherlands, to join the Academic Division of the International Baccalaureate. At the IB, I oversee both the implementation of the current... Read More →



Tuesday June 28, 2016 10:00am - 11:30am
San Jacinto Center Room 204

10:00am

10B Rome: In Situ & in the Lab 2015

Last summer, the ACL sponsored a study tour/technology workshop for teachers to visit some of the most significant classical sites in Rome and Sicily and learn how to use the latest technologies to bring those experiences to the classroom. Participants altered between days spent visiting museums and archaeological sites and days spent in the computer lab learning new technological skills focused on teaching Latin in the 21st century. Of particular interest were the special sessions held in conjunction with the Capitoline Museum and special tours. This panel presentation allows course participants to share how they have put their new knowledge and skills to use in their classrooms with fellow teachers.


moderators
avatar for Zee Poerio

Zee Poerio

k-8 Computer Teacher, Diocese of Pittsburgh / St. Louise de Marillac School
Zee Poerio is the k-8 Computer teacher and advisor for the Student Technology Team at St. Louise de Marillac Catholic School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where she has been teaching for 18 years. Serving as a Teacher Ambassador for CREATE Lab at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute and on multiple committees for the American Classical League, Zee’s passion is connecting modern technology with ancient studies. @MagistraZee loves... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Cindy Caltagirone

Cindy Caltagirone

National Training Academy IT, ACL Technology Committee


Tuesday June 28, 2016 10:00am - 11:30am
San Jacinto Center Room 206

10:00am

10C Science Fiction in the Latin and Classical Humanities Classrooms

Science Fiction (SF) is a powerful vehicle for stimulating students’ imagination about other cultures and languages. Because so much SF builds upon classical models, strategic use of SF in the Latin classroom can be an engaging way to develop students’ skills of perception, critical thinking, story analysis, cultural awareness and understanding of languages. Four presentations will discuss useful SF texts for the Latin and classical humanities classrooms and offer specific examples of assignments for teachers to use. The first presentation surveys fifty years of classics-based SF, including standard and little-known stories, movies, and television shows. The second uses the Cambridge Latin Course tie-in Dr. Who episode, “Fires of Vesuvius,” to emphasize Roman values. The third develops writing exercises around the recent YA series, Red Rising (Pierce Brown), about a Roman-like (and influenced) civilization on Mars. The final presentation addresses connections between Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games and Ovidian and Catullan poetry.


moderators
avatar for Natalie Cannon

Natalie Cannon

Department Chair & Teacher, Eanes ISD
Salve! I am Natalie Cannon, and I teach Latin, Mythology, and Roman Cultures to the talented and quirky students at Westlake High School. My colleague and I co-sponsor a very large, active Latin Club. I am the President of the Austin-area Armadillo Classical Society, was awarded membership as a PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator, and am also a member of the TCA, ACL, ACTFL, and TCEA. This is my 10th year of teaching Latin, and 9 of those years... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Robert Cape

Robert Cape

Professor of Classics, Austin College
I teach Latin, Greek, and ancient history at Austin College (Sherman, TX). I also teach courses on women in antiquity, film and the ancient world, and science fiction and classics. My favorite author is Cicero! Talk to me about AP Latin, science fiction and classics, or just about anything, really.
avatar for Keely Lake

Keely Lake

Teacher of Latin and Ancient Greek; Coordinator of Interdisciplinary Programs, Wayland Academy



Tuesday June 28, 2016 10:00am - 11:30am
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

10:00am

10D Gradūs Parvī: Creating Tiered Readings for Any Level of Instruction

After a brief introduction to the ACTFL interpretive reading proficiency standards and the theory behind creating tiered reading passages of a text, workshop participants will be divided into groups depending on the level they are most interested in working with (beginner, intermediate, or advanced) in order to produce a completed tiered text collaboratively. Tiered texts, often called embedded readings, provide a scaffolded approach to reading comprehension which afford the opportunity for learners of any ability level to find success and interact meaningfully with the text. A quality tiered text offers built-in differentiation in a way that no static text or traditional commentary can provide. At the conclusion of the workshop, all materials will be shared with participants digitally so that everyone will have access to multiple tiered texts to use in their classrooms immediately.


moderators
avatar for John Bracey

John Bracey

Weston Middle School
I am a middle school Latin teacher who teaches using a Comprehensible Input approach. I believe that best practices, equity, and inclusivity are the keys to a successful Latin program.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Ballestrini

Kevin Ballestrini

Storrs, CT, US, The Pericles Group, LLC
Classics teacher at the Norwich Free Academy in Connecticut, instructional designer, and game designer. Co-founder of The Pericles Group.



Tuesday June 28, 2016 10:00am - 11:30am
UTC Room 4.110

10:00am

10E1 Latin Textpert Podcasts

This paper will present a modern spin on the “student becomes an expert on a Latin text” project. Upper level high school students complete an assignment where they master a passage of Latin, including translation (first literal, then literary), the author’s background, historical context, and literary devices. They then produce a podcast intended for a general audience to exhibit their expertise. This project is inspired by Christopher Francese’s A Podcasting Approach to Greek and Latin Orality in the Spring 2015 Teaching Classical Languages, but is intended to focus more on the high school goals of translation and background research (e.g. information on the author and broader history) as opposed to Latin performance.


moderators
MS

Melanie Stowell

Swanson Middle School

Speakers


Tuesday June 28, 2016 10:00am - 11:30am
UTC Room 4.112

10:00am

10E2 Formative Fun: Games in the Latin Classroom

Several of us learned Latin via "drill and kill," or similar ideologies. It can be hard for us, especially when facing multiple preps or large class sizes, to find other ways to reinforce key fundamentals like grammar concepts and vocabulary. This paper offers examples of easy-to-create, easy-to-play, and easy-to-assess games to give teachers low-prep, low-stress options to add variety and fun to their classrooms. Games include a reinterpretation of Battle Ship and Tic-Tac-Toe, as well as less familiar ones like Surrender on Six. This presentation is not reliant upon the use of any specific textbook or teaching method.

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B5tNQh7sHThLSmZGUzJUcjlMYlU&usp=sharing


moderators
avatar for Cindy Caltagirone

Cindy Caltagirone

National Training Academy IT, ACL Technology Committee

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Jarnagin

Jennifer Jarnagin

Latin Teacher, The Episcopal School of Dallas
I've been teaching Latin since 2008. I've taught high school levels 1-AP, and now teach mostly middle school. Next year will be my first time teaching 5th and 6th graders, so my focus right now is finding introductory materials and making a curriculum that will challenge and delight this age group and make them want to continue studying Latin. I consider my strengths to be building excitement about Latin and growing Latin programs, classroom... Read More →



Tuesday June 28, 2016 10:00am - 11:30am
UTC Room 4.112

11:30am

1:00pm

11A Good Living: bringing ancient Roman philosophy to life in and out of the classroom

Have you ever wished that your Latin class could teach students not only to be great scholars but also to be amazing people? Two ancient authors, Lucretius and Marcus Aurelius, offer a transformational experience to readers and ought to be central to our outreach for the classics in the modern world. The De Rerum Natura and the Meditations communicate to students more clearly and immediately than any other works from classical antiquity, speaking to the human condition, unconstrained by time or culture. In this workshop, the presenter will relate his experiences teaching these authors and offer methods that use the literature to impact students in the living of their lives as powerful human beings. Participants will be empowered to design courses that create transformational opportunities for students through philosophy. All things must pass, but your Latin class will have a lasting effect on your students’ lives.

Digital Handout:
https://goo.gl/9Bpj3k


Slideshow:
https://goo.gl/hUJKWf
 


moderators
Speakers
avatar for Charles Umiker

Charles Umiker

Latin Teacher, The Tatnall School
Delaware Delegate | CAAS Delegate


Tuesday June 28, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

1:00pm

11B Magical, Mystical, and Marvelous: The Power of Three in Latin Literature

Three is a powerful number. From tricolons to forms in triplicate, it shows up in modern life in nearly innumerable ways. So too for the ancients who seemed ascribed to this number mystical qualities. It was the basis for magical spells, curses, and blessings. It gave order to chaotic situations. And it provides a different perspective on Latin literature for modern readers. In this session, we will discuss the role of the number three in Latin literature, with special focus on Vergil's "Aeneid," Caesar's "Gallic Wars," and other writings common in high school Latin curricula. Attendees will look and listen to the power of this magical number in literature, art, and music. (Can you find all the "threes" in this abstract? Magical.)


moderators
avatar for Kevin Ballestrini

Kevin Ballestrini

Storrs, CT, US, The Pericles Group, LLC
Classics teacher at the Norwich Free Academy in Connecticut, instructional designer, and game designer. Co-founder of The Pericles Group.

Speakers
avatar for Daryl Grissom

Daryl Grissom

Upper School Latin & History Teacher, St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School
Dr. Daryl “Gus” Grissom teaches both History and Classics at St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes School in Alexandria, Virginia. He received his Ph.D. in History at the University of Maryland, College Park, with a dissertation focused on Thucydides’ analysis of the Peloponnesian War. But his tenure as a Communications Officer in the United States Marine Corps gives him a special interest in integrating technology in the... Read More →


Tuesday June 28, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
UTC Room 4.112

1:00pm

11C Small Changes, Big Results: Making Your Textbook Work for You and Your Students

Good Latin teachers aim to make the language accessible to varied learning styles and ability levels, engage students in learning, and bring enough creativity to the table to keep our students excited to come to class. Most of us have a single textbook as a resource, which we may or may not have chosen ourselves. In this practical, hands-on workshop, we will explore how to adapt textbook materials to work better for our students and for us. Creativity doesn’t mean creating everything from scratch! Learn how to adapt a textbook exercise to change the focus, add scaffolding, or make students more active, collaborative, or analytical. This session is intended for new teachers looking to build a successful and sustainable teaching career, as well as experienced teachers looking for new tips and tricks. The materials provided are based on Ecce Romani, but the ideas can be transferred to any textbook.


moderators
avatar for David Pellegrino

David Pellegrino

Pittsford Mendon High School

Speakers
avatar for Amy Sommer

Amy Sommer

Latin teacher, Cherry Creek High School



Tuesday June 28, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

1:00pm

11D The Value of Writing in the Cl Classroom

Traditionally, we have thought that practicing a skill is how we learn it, and we have thought that having students write in Latin would help them learn their Latin better. Second Language Acquisition research indicates that writing in the second language does not help students make progress, so why bother with writing? Time is precious, and we want to focus on what helps students make progress. This session will explore what value there is in writing and reflecting on writing in Latin for the Latin classroom particularly for those who are using Comprehensible Input as their mode of teaching. Participants will leave with an approach that requires minimal work on the part of the teacher, a rubric to help their students write and reflect on their writing, and an understanding of writing and reflecting on writing that is of real value to them and their students.


moderators
avatar for Justin Slocum Bailey

Justin Slocum Bailey

Teacher, Trainer, Thinker-bigger, Indwelling Language
I am gung-ho about about making second language acquisition more joyful and more successful for both learners and teachers. I would love to think big with you about how to provide maximum CI with minimal prep.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Patrick

Robert Patrick

Chair, Foreign Language Department, Latin Teacher, Parkview High School
For more than half of my 27 years as a Latin teacher, I have devoted myself to creating classrooms where all kinds of learners are welcome and where all students can be successful. My work has come to focus on Comprehensible Input as the key piece to this work: delivering understandable messages in Latin in a variety of ways.



Tuesday June 28, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
UTC Room 4.110

1:00pm

2:00pm

BREAK
Come visit the exhibit area and enjoy the break sponsored by

Tuesday June 28, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
San Jacinto Center Multi-Purpose Room

2:30pm

12A The Evolution of the Classical Essay: From Drafting to Coding

This session will address various strategies for teaching students how to become critical thinkers and analytical writers. We will begin with the students’ first introduction to textual analysis, exploring some of the questions students can ask and things they can look for when analyzing a text. Then, we will review systems and practices for helping students respond to a prompt analytically: generating ideas, organizing them into a thesis and arguments, and supporting these arguments with evidence. We will also see how to apply this same process to writing original essays, where students develop their own thesis. Finally, we will explore how, at the most advanced level, students can apply these skills in a new interactive medium—computer coding. Participants will have the opportunity to view two computer programs, written by high school students, which take viewers through a close analysis of Ovid’s Metamorphoses.


Speakers
avatar for Kristin Webster

Kristin Webster

Upper School Latin Teacher, The Marymount School
I have been teaching Latin for the past nine years to students of all levels, from elementary to undergraduate. I am particularly interested in curriculum design, assessment, and differentiation through the use of technology. I am also working on an iBook called The Digital Latin Classroom. If you're in my session, feel free to contact me with any questions: kwebster@marymountnyc.org.


SWIMTAG docx

Tuesday June 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

2:30pm

12B Authentic Engagement and Student Empowerment

Educators often discuss how to get students engaged, but seldom question "engaged in what?" "The Latin (or Greek) language" is one answer that perhaps no one would dispute, but when classical language instruction focuses on modern life in order to generate enthusiasm, we risk exacerbating the tension (already felt by many teachers, whatever their preferred approach[es]) between the communication and culture standards. In this panel, we will first discuss not only how to leverage pre-existing interest in Greco-Roman culture into engagement with the language, but also how to use Latin to generate interest in the culture. Secondly, we will discuss strategies to give students more control over their own learning in order to overcome potential inhibitors and to develop the ability and desire to work independently, which facilitates the voluntary reading of engaging material that research has shown to benefit language acquisition.


moderators
AV

Alan van den Arend

Graduate Student, University of Kentucky
I'm a graduate student at the University of Kentucky, with previous teaching experience at suburban high schools in NJ. I completed my BA in Classics from Cornell in 2010, was a fellow at the Academia Vivarium Novum from 2013-2014, and am currently pursuing my MA in Classics at UK, along with certifications in Latin Studies and Social Theory. My research interests focus on intellectual history and Latin reception, especially in the Neo-Latin... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ivy Livingston

Ivy Livingston

Preceptor in the Classics, Harvard University
MS

Melanie Stowell

Swanson Middle School


Tuesday June 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

2:30pm

12C An ETC Potpourri: Bring your Latin classroom to life!

This workshop will focus on activities and tools to use in the classroom, particularly with elementary and middle school students. Attendees will be introduced to easy tech tools, cultural activities, project ideas, and outside resources for use in the classroom.


Speakers
avatar for Ruth Ann Besse

Ruth Ann Besse

Latin & ESOL Teacher, Reservoir High School
I teach two subjects in a Howard County public high school: Latin and U.S. History for ESOL students. After school, I teach Latin to home-schooled children. Promoting Latin for younger students truly interests me and that's why I am a member of the "Excellence Through Classics Committee" and "The Primary Latin Project."
avatar for Krystal Kubichek

Krystal Kubichek

Vice-chair, ETC
Though I teach in NJ, I live in Philadelphia, PA. I've taught Latin I-IV AP at PHS, a public school in the most diverse district in NJ, for the past 7 years. I've also been lucky enough to have some of the best mentors a Latin teacher can ask for. My students are active in NJCL: we hosted NJ's 2015 Convention. I'm vice-chair of Excellence Through Classics (ETC). I also founded a group on Facebook for Latin teachers in PA, DE, and NJ called the... Read More →
avatar for Zee Poerio

Zee Poerio

k-8 Computer Teacher, Diocese of Pittsburgh / St. Louise de Marillac School
Zee Poerio is the k-8 Computer teacher and advisor for the Student Technology Team at St. Louise de Marillac Catholic School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where she has been teaching for 18 years. Serving as a Teacher Ambassador for CREATE Lab at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute and on multiple committees for the American Classical League, Zee’s passion is connecting modern technology with ancient studies. @MagistraZee loves... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Ramahlo

Michelle Ramahlo

Chair, ETC
I've been teaching Latin to 5-8th grades in Chappaqua, NY, for 9 years. I teach primarily using TPRS, via the Cambridge Latin Course. I'm originally from Dallas, Texas, but made my way to New York through Columbia University where I studied middle east history and Arabic. I attended graduate school in Latin Education at Hunter College in New York. I'm the chair of Excellence Through Classics, the elementary branch of ACL. I like to ride my bike... Read More →


Tuesday June 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

2:30pm

12D Rethinking Classical Civilisations

One of the founding aims of the Cambridge School Classics Project is to provide the means to engage with a broad range of classical cultures. To that end, a new series of books complemented by digital materials suitable for UK years 7-9 (US grades 6-8) classrooms is in production. Each of the “Exploring Classical Civilisations” series attempts to expand the scope of Classical Civilisation as a subject, encompassing Persia, Early Rome and literature in translation such as Ovid's Metamorphoses and the Iliad. The aim is to provoke discussion among students and encourage them to assess for themselves the ancient world and its influence.
This session presents the first publications of the series, gives a sense of its aims and approach, and discusses the future trajectory of the course.



Tuesday June 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
UTC Room 4.110

2:30pm

12E Your state's seal of biliteracy

In the last five years a growing number of states have authorized their schools to add a Seal of Biliteracy to the diplomas of high school seniors who have demonstrated proficiency in more than one language. We will talk about how this movement is growing and what is happening in CAMWS states.


moderators
avatar for Keely Lake

Keely Lake

Teacher of Latin and Ancient Greek; Coordinator of Interdisciplinary Programs, Wayland Academy

Speakers
avatar for Mary Pendergraft

Mary Pendergraft

Professor of Classical Languages, Wake Forest University
Chair, NCLG



Tuesday June 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
UTC Room 4.112

3:00pm

NJCL Committee Meeting
Speakers
MB

Melissa Burgess

Oh, Indian Hill
DJ

David Jackson

Academic Contests Chair, Oak Hall School Senior
avatar for Sherry Jankowski

Sherry Jankowski

adult, Flint Hill School
Programs Chair, NJCL, living Latin, The Walking Dead
avatar for Caitlin Johnston

Caitlin Johnston

Publications Chair, scl
WL

William Lee

Certamen Chair
TM

Tony Martin

Olympika Chair / NSCL Advisor, National Junior Classical League
TR

Tom Reed

Digital Contests Chair
Digital Contests Chair, NJCL
avatar for Sue Robertson

Sue Robertson

adult, NJCL Convention Advisor
Please let me know how things are going for you during the week of convention and what you would like to see changed, etc.
avatar for Catherine Sturgill

Catherine Sturgill

Public Relations/Membership Chair
DV

Dobbie Vasquez

Communications Chair, Menlo School Upper School
Communications Chair, NJCL; Program and Scholarship Committees, ACL; Open Certamen Chair, CJCL; Past President and Secretary, CCA-North
DW

Dennis Webb

Constitutional Advisor

Executive Committee
AE

Amy Elifrits

Chair, and Creative Arts, National Junior Classical League

Tuesday June 28, 2016 3:00pm - 5:00pm
San Jacinto Center Room 1211

3:30pm

ETC Open Meeting
All are welcome! 

moderators
avatar for Krystal Kubichek

Krystal Kubichek

Vice-chair, ETC
Though I teach in NJ, I live in Philadelphia, PA. I've taught Latin I-IV AP at PHS, a public school in the most diverse district in NJ, for the past 7 years. I've also been lucky enough to have some of the best mentors a Latin teacher can ask for. My students are active in NJCL: we hosted NJ's 2015 Convention. I'm vice-chair of Excellence Through Classics (ETC). I also founded a group on Facebook for Latin teachers in PA, DE, and NJ called the... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Ramahlo

Michelle Ramahlo

Chair, ETC
I've been teaching Latin to 5-8th grades in Chappaqua, NY, for 9 years. I teach primarily using TPRS, via the Cambridge Latin Course. I'm originally from Dallas, Texas, but made my way to New York through Columbia University where I studied middle east history and Arabic. I attended graduate school in Latin Education at Hunter College in New York. I'm the chair of Excellence Through Classics, the elementary branch of ACL. I like to ride my bike... Read More →

Tuesday June 28, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

4:00pm

13A Changing the Paradigm: Holistic Assessment in the Latin Classroom

As teachers, most of us are familiar (if not necessarily completely comfortable) with assessment OF our students’ learning. Some may have explored assessment FOR learning and assessment AS learning. But is it possible to change the culture of a Latin program, to build enrollment, and to retain students by changing our approach to assessment? This workshop will explore the use of holistic minor and major assessments, including both “pure” and modified versions ACTFL’s Integrated Performance Assessment, in various Latin programs. After considering the basic format and rationale of holistic assessments, we will look in detail at specific sample assessments (and student responses) from students at various proficiency levels. We conclude with real-life examples -- and student and parent testimonials -- about the effects of holistic assessment on the culture, size, and retention rates of Latin programs which are using holistic assessment approaches.


moderators
Speakers
JS

Justin Schwamm

Latin Teacher, Massey Hill Classical High School


Tuesday June 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 204

4:00pm

13B Perceiving Caesar and Vergil in Three Dimensions: Helping Students Follow Narrative and Interaction Using Particles and Word Order

Sometimes a linear text seems to students like a continuous stream of information running uncontrolled along the x-axis -- seemingly infinite and beyond retention. Just a few cues, however, offered by common discourse particles and word-order patterns can elevate their low-level perspective and open their eyes to a hierarchical organization that breaks texts vertically into manageable sense units, and even projects out from the page to engage the reader along an unexpected z-axis.

This workshop provides attendees with a brief background in Functional Discourse Grammar and describes the roles played by particles like autem, igitur, and vero in either cuing readers to informational structure or managing the relationship between the writer and the reader. Distinctions between supposed synonyms like nam and enim are demonstrated along with surprising signals from word-order patterns.

Participants should bring a device to learn techniques for manipulating texts from Caesar and Vergil with students.


Executive Committee
avatar for Patrick McFadden

Patrick McFadden

ACL Secretary, St Mary's Episcopal School
I am particularly interested in issues of linguistics and pedagogy. Most of my work deals with applying Reading Theory to teaching Latin/Greek. I am also heavily involved in Tennessee's Latin Helps publicity campaign. Friend Latin Helps on FB, follow @LatinHelps on Twitter, or search #latinhelps on any social medium.


Tuesday June 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Room 206

4:00pm

13C1 Ex Libris: Reflections on The Swerve, bookplates, bookends, bookcases, and book clubs

As an enthusiastic member of the inaugural ACL Book Club, the presenter will share reflections on books, both ancient and modern, their ownership, their storage, their display, their worth. With references to The Swerve and De Rerum Natura, with visuals of "capsae" and "libraria", with a treasury of bookplates, bibliophiles will depart with ideas for their classrooms or another tool in their toolkit!


moderators
avatar for Robert Cape

Robert Cape

Professor of Classics, Austin College
I teach Latin, Greek, and ancient history at Austin College (Sherman, TX). I also teach courses on women in antiquity, film and the ancient world, and science fiction and classics. My favorite author is Cicero! Talk to me about AP Latin, science fiction and classics, or just about anything, really.

Speakers
LM

Linda Montross

Co-chair, National Latin Exam


Tuesday June 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

4:00pm

13C2 Classics in 21st Century Cartoons

Following a brief overview of 20th-century cartoons dealing with the Classical world, and, especially, classical mythology, this presentation considers the Classical themes which continue to be used by 21st-century cartoonists and how the artists adapt and modernize these themes. Cartoons from the comic have tended to focus on depictions of the Trojan horse, Narcissus, Atlas, Sisyphus and the Ides of March to the exclusion of other themes like Laocoon and Diogenes, which were more popular in the 20th century The presentation will conclude with a brief discussion with the audience about why these particular types of cartoons remain popular in the 21st-century and not others which were popular in the 20th-century and how these cartoons can be integrated into the Latin classroom.


moderators
avatar for Robert Cape

Robert Cape

Professor of Classics, Austin College
I teach Latin, Greek, and ancient history at Austin College (Sherman, TX). I also teach courses on women in antiquity, film and the ancient world, and science fiction and classics. My favorite author is Cicero! Talk to me about AP Latin, science fiction and classics, or just about anything, really.

Speakers

Tuesday June 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
San Jacinto Center Rooms 208/210

4:00pm

13D1 Signa Latina: A Grammatical Sign Language

This workshop will introduce participants to a series of signs that represent grammatical concepts (like the indirect impact of the dative case) through hand motions. Signing is a powerful strategy for communicating meaning, and the objective of the Signa Latina is to give students a new tool for thinking about grammar in order to help them process the meaning of Latin expressions. Teachers can use the signs to explain the concepts underlying the grammar of Latin nouns and verbs using visual and kinesthetic cues. Students can use the signs to express and acknowledge their understanding of Latin forms. Signa Latina is appropriate for students of any age and can be incorporated into form drills, translation exercises, spoken Latin exercises, literature readings, and technical discussions about grammar.

Links we'll visit during the presentation:
Garrio
Noun Forms Exercise
Sentences Exercise
Simpsons Image 
Magistrula.com 


moderators
avatar for Amy Sommer

Amy Sommer

Latin teacher, Cherry Creek High School

Speakers
avatar for Anna Andresian

Anna Andresian

Frontend Engineer, AltSchool
I taught Middle and Upper School Latin for 11 years in RI, NV, CO, and NJ, then transitioned in 2014 to a career as a software developer. I currently work as a Frontend Engineer at AltSchool in San Francisco, where I get to build software products for our students & teachers. A short list of things I love: pedagogy, curriculum design, programming, historical linguistics, spoken Latin. | | In 2012, I stumbled upon a teaching tool that allowed... Read More →



Tuesday June 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.110

4:00pm

13D2 Latin Authors in Situ (or as close as possible)

Reading ancient authors in the original languages on site has developed into a major component of the overseas workshops we direct. We have discovered that other study tours do not incorporate this process, which we believe serves to enhance the understanding of the language, meaning of the texts, and context of passages even when the particular passages are not ekphrastic. Our session will speak on behalf of combining the sites and museums with thematically appropriate texts and how this method results in creating an unparalleled educational experience for both teachers and students. We will also address ways to adapt this successfully into the classroom when a quick visit to Rome or Athens isn’t feasible.


moderators
avatar for Amy Sommer

Amy Sommer

Latin teacher, Cherry Creek High School

Speakers
avatar for Amy Leonard

Amy Leonard

Latin Teacher, Grady High School



Tuesday June 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.110

4:00pm

13E Teaching Latin with a Novel--All Modes of Communication

This workshop will briefly review the power of easy, compelling reading in language acquisition. The facilitator will outline and briefly illustrate the variety of activities that can be incorporated into reading a novel in Latin as part of a Latin curriculum The variety of activities will imploy the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretative and presentational, with more than one example of each. The facilitator will explore using the novel as either the main focus of the curriculum or as an add-on to other curricular activities. Participants will take away digital access to the descriptions of all activities used in this workshop for follow up references after the Institute.


Speakers
avatar for Robert Patrick

Robert Patrick

Chair, Foreign Language Department, Latin Teacher, Parkview High School
For more than half of my 27 years as a Latin teacher, I have devoted myself to creating classrooms where all kinds of learners are welcome and where all students can be successful. My work has come to focus on Comprehensible Input as the key piece to this work: delivering understandable messages in Latin in a variety of ways.



Tuesday June 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
UTC Room 4.112

7:00pm

9:00pm

Annual ACL Institute Banquet Reception
Enjoy dessert and coffe at the reception sponsored by Cambridge University Press. Join in the sing-a-long with Stan Farrow at the piano! 

Tuesday June 28, 2016 9:00pm - 10:30pm
ATT Center